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Staff Handbook

1. Introduction

1.1 The Staff Handbook

By joining the staff of the University of Arkansas and the University community, you have become an important part of the state's most exciting and challenging educational endeavor. The University's success in carrying out its mission is, in large part, dependent on the success of each of its employees. Your skills, pride, and commitment to your work help ensure the continued progress and strength of the University.

This handbook is intended to help you by providing information about University policies and procedures related to employment, employee benefits, and programs and services available to staff. Much of the material in the Staff Handbook is summarized, excerpted, or paraphrased, so the handbook is a guide rather than a complete source of information on employment-related subjects. Whenever possible, the source of the information is cited, and additional details can be found in the Board Policies, Fayetteville Policies and Procedures, Universitywide Administrative Memoranda, State personnel policies, State laws, and other documents referred to in the handbook. If you need help in locating any of these source documents, please ask your dean, director, vice chancellor, or Human Resources. The Staff Handbook is accessible in electronic format through the Human Resources web site, http://hr.uark.edu/, and may be downloaded, stored, or printed as needed.

If there is a conflict between this handbook and official University Board Policy, Universitywide Administrative Memoranda, Fayetteville Policies and Procedures, or State of Arkansas policy or law, those policies, memoranda, or laws will prevail. The University reserves the right to revise, modify, or repeal any statements included in this handbook and any of these policies or procedures through future actions. Information contained in this handbook is not intended to establish an employment contract of any kind or duration. This handbook is not a legal document. This edition of the Staff Handbook supersedes previous editions.

References:
Arkansas Code
Fayetteville Policies and Procedures

OPM Policies and Procedures Manual
United States Code
University of Arkansas Board of Trustees Policies

Tuesday, December 21, 2010 7:37 PM

1.2 The University of Arkansas System

The University of Arkansas was established in Fayetteville by the Arkansas General Assembly in 1871 as the Arkansas Industrial University, and under the Morrill Act of 1862 became the state land-grant institution and first state-assisted college in Arkansas. In 1873 the University established its second campus in Pine Bluff, which in 1890 was designated as a land-grant campus. In 1879 the University accepted responsibility for the academic management and operation of a new privately-established, not-for-profit medical campus located in Little Rock. This campus was merged into the University by the General Assembly in 1911, and is now the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Little Rock University, a private institution founded in 1927 as Little Rock Junior College, was merged into the University System in 1969 as the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. In 1971 Arkansas A & M College was merged into the University System as the University of Arkansas at Monticello. The Pine Bluff campus, which had been separated in 1927 and called Arkansas A M & N College, was reunited with the University in 1972 as the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. In 1996, two community colleges were adopted into the University of Arkansas system and became Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas, located at Helena, and the University of Arkansas Community College at Hope. In 1998, Gateway Technical College became part of the University of Arkansas system and was renamed the University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville. In 2001, Petit Jean Technical College became the University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton, and the System also acquired Cassatot Community College of the University of Arkansas, with a main campus in DeQueen and sites in Nashville and Ashdown. In 2002, Westark Community College joined the System as the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith. In 2003, Forest Echoes Technical Institute and Great Rivers Technical Institute merged with the University of Arkansas at Monticello to become the UAM College of Technology, Crossett, and the UAM College of Technology, McGehee. The Arkansas School for Mathematics and Sciences merged with the University of Arkansas System on January 1, 2004.  The University of Arkansas Clinton School of Public Service was founded, in conjunction with the Clinton Presidential Library, on January 29, 2004.

The University of Arkansas System administration is located on the Cammack Campus in Little Rock.

The Cooperative Extension Service has headquarters in Little Rock and offices in all 75 Arkansas counties. The Agricultural Experiment Station operates research facilities on three University of Arkansas campuses, at Arkansas State University, at regional centers and in branch stations and other locations throughout Arkansas. The Criminal Justice Institute is headquartered in Little Rock. The Arkansas Archeological Survey's Coordinating Office is located in Fayetteville and Survey archaeologists are based at seven public universities. Research stations are located at Toltec Mounds State Park and Parkin Archeological State Park.

Through the major campuses, the community colleges, and through the state-wide operating divisions of the Arkansas Archeological Survey and the Division of Agriculture, the University carries out its mission, which may be broadly stated as follows:

The University of Arkansas is a comprehensive, multi-campus, publicly-aided institution dedicated to the improvement of the mind and spirit through the development and dissemination of knowledge.

The University embraces and expands the historic trust inherent in the land-grant philosophy by providing access to academic and professional education, by developing intellectual growth and cultural awareness in its students, and by applying knowledge and research skills to an ever-changing human condition.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:38 PM

1.3 The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

The University of Arkansas was established in Fayetteville in 1871. It opened its doors to students on January 22, 1872.

There were few facilities and practically no money for the beginning of that first academic year over a century ago, but the new institution had one advantage which has been of increasing importance throughout the years. It was established under provisions of the Morrill Act as both the State University and the Land-Grant College of Arkansas. This fact gave it an academic heritage from the universities of the past and the educational responsibilities in "agriculture and the mechanic arts" envisioned by Senator Justin Smith Morrill of Vermont, sponsor of the legislation setting aside federal land-grant funds to assist the various states in their efforts to establish programs of higher education.

The location of Fayetteville for the University was determined as a result of an election held in counties, cities, and incorporated towns for the purpose of voting bonds or subscriptions to support the establishment of the University. The largest bid came from the County of Washington and the City of Fayetteville for a combined total of $130,000. To this amount and the Congressional land grant of 150,000 acres, the state added an appropriation of $50,000.

The 160-acre homestead of William McIlroy was selected as the site at a purchase price of $12,000. The McIlroy home was converted into classrooms, and a new two-story frame building was constructed with one classroom on each floor.

From a small beginning of eight students and three faculty members on the opening day of classes, the University has developed into a mature institution and has become the major center in Arkansas for graduate-level instruction and basic and applied research. Its public service activities reach every county in Arkansas.

The academic units in Fayetteville include nine colleges and schools: the Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences, the School of Architecture, the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, the Sam M. Walton College of Business, the College of Education and Health Professions, the College of Engineering, the Honors College, the School of Law, and the Graduate School.

The University maintains more than 60 special research and outreach programs, which are often interdisciplinary, and are conducted at centers and research units on campus, throughout the state, and in association with other universities. Information about these centers and research facilities can be found in the University of Arkansas Profile published annually and also available on the University's web site, http://www.uark.edu/.

In 1997, the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools continued the University's accreditation through the doctoral level, with the next review scheduled in 2006-2007. Full information concerning the current scope of the University's academic program, including course offerings, undergraduate degree programs, graduate degree programs, and requirements for degrees can be found in the Catalog of Studies, the Graduate School Catalog, or the School of Law Catalog, all of which are available on-line.

The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, serves as the major center of liberal and professional education and as the primary land-grant campus in the state. In addition, it is Arkansas' major source of theoretical and applied research and the provider of a wide range of public services to people throughout the state and the nation. It is the vision of the University of Arkansas to be a nationally-competitive student-centered research university serving Arkansas and the world. Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of the University are working to realize that vision through five major institutional goals: strengthening the University's academic quality and reputation by enhancing and developing programs of excellence in teaching, research, and outreach; increasing the size and quality of the student body; enhancing diversity among our faculty, students, and staff; increasing public financial support; and increasing private gift support.

The University offers a broad spectrum of academic programs leading to baccalaureate, master's, doctoral, and professional degrees, not only in the traditional disciplines within arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, but also in the core professional areas of agriculture, architecture, business, education, engineering, home economics, and law. Through its faculty and its student body, the campus seeks to have all of its programs regionally competitive and, in addition, to offer nationally competitive programs in selected areas.

The campus has state-wide responsibility to provide research leadership in advancing the frontiers of knowledge. The research programs serve three primary purposes. First, as part of graduate instruction, research promotes students' abilities to appreciate and implement, to discover and to teach. Second, research programs serve as vital sources of information on the economic and social needs of Arkansas. Third, in selected areas, research on the Fayetteville campus serves a national and international scholarly community. The campus is committed to a future which includes sustained growth in its research and scholarship.

The University provides extensive technical and professional services to varied groups and individuals throughout the state, helping to further Arkansas' economic growth. In addition, the Fayetteville campus serves as a significant academic resource to the state. It operates nationally respected high school and college level correspondence programs; it assists other institutions in developing educational programs; it offers graduate programs, both cooperatively and singly, throughout the state; and it makes specialized campus resources such as computing services and library resources available to other institutions in the state. The campus will continue to serve this unique role and may expand these services to continue providing distance education through an uplink/downlink network, through the world wide web and other distance-learning connections, and through additional cooperative graduate education programs.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:37 PM

1.4 University Governance

(Board Policy 810.1, effective July 1, 1996; revised June 6, 2003)

The articles of campus governance for the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville have been adopted by the Board of Trustees. The following excerpts from the Board policy include the full text of all sections which relate to staff governance. Sections relating to faculty and student governance are summarized or excerpted.

PREAMBLE

In adopting this policy for articles of local campus government for the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, the Board of Trustees, on its own motion, may at any time review, amend, revise, overrule or affirm any matter, policy, resolution or legislation that may be adopted by any group referred to hereinafter.

ARTICLE I - THE FACULTY

  1. Authority
     
    1. The faculty, acting under the Board of Trustees, shall have responsibility for all matters of academic concern. Such matters shall include, but not be limited to:
      1. admission requirements; transfer of credits; withdrawals; academic honesty; scholastic probation, suspension, and dismissal;
      2. curriculum and courses;
      3. degrees and requirements for degrees;
      4. University academic calendars and schedules;
      5. award of academic honors.
         
    2. The faculty may make recommendations on any institutional matter of faculty concern. Such matters shall include, but not be limited to:
      1. a. policies regarding faculty status, including appointments, promotions, granting of tenure, retirement, nonreappointment, and dismissal;
      2. b. policies affecting the general welfare, working conditions, and the services performed by and for the faculty; and
      3. c. policies relating to academic and professional research and other scholarly and creative activities.

(sections omitted)

ARTICLE II - THE FACULTY SENATE

  1. Authority
    1. The Faculty Senate shall exercise general legislative powers for the faculty as outlined in Article I, Section A.
       
    2. The Faculty Senate shall have sole jurisdiction over:
      1. admission requirements; transfer of credits; withdrawals; academic honesty; scholastic probation, suspension, and dismissal;
      2. curriculum and courses;
      3. degrees and requirements for degrees;
      4. award of academic honors;
      5. recommendations to the Board of Trustees of the names of individuals to receive honorary degrees.
         
    3. The Faculty Senate will report to the Campus Council for informational and advisory purposes all legislation which it passes.

(sections omitted)

ARTICLE IV - THE STUDENTS

  1. Authority
     
    1. The students, acting through the Associated Student Government, shall participate in University decisions affecting their welfare. The Associated Student Government ("ASG" hereinafter) shall both represent the students and serve them.
       
    2. The judicial power of the Associate Student Government shall be vested in the All-Student Judicial Board, which shall have the duties and powers provided in the ASG Constitution and Code.
       
    3. The ASG Constitution has been approved by the Board of Trustees of the University of Arkansas, and any changes in that constitution shall also be approved by the Board.

(sections omitted)

ARTICLE V - THE STUDENT SENATE

  1. Authority
     
    1. The Student Senate shall exercise general legislative powers for the students, including but not limited to those powers listed in the ASG Constitution.
       
    2. The Student Senate will report to the Campus Council for informational and advisory purposes all legislation which it passes. Any legislation not within the sole jurisdiction of the Student Senate shall be referred to the Campus Council for final action.

(sections omitted)

ARTICLE VI - THE STAFF

  1. Authority
     
    1. The staff, acting through the Staff Senate, shall have responsibility relating to the quality of the work life of the staff, the efficiency of the University's operations, and the staff's service to the campus community.
       
    2. The staff, acting through the Staff Senate, may make recommendations on any matter of staff concern. Such matters shall include, but not be limited to:
      1. fringe benefits;
      2. University calendars and schedules;
      3. compensation;
      4. work schedules and working conditions;
      5. hiring and dismissal procedures;
      6. staff and administrative evaluation;
      7. grievance procedures;
      8. environment and safety;
      9. physical facilities; and
      10. health and wellness.
         
  2. Membership

    In these Articles, "staff" shall mean all UAF employees eligible for fringe benefits who are not represented by either the Faculty Senate or the Student Senate.
     

  3. Officers

    The officers of the staff shall be the officers of the Staff Senate.
     

  4. Meetings

    Meetings of the Staff Senate shall be open to all members of the staff, and they shall have an opportunity to be heard as provided in by-laws adopted by the Staff Senate.
     

  5. Committees

    The Staff Senate shall establish appropriate standing committees of the staff, and shall adopt rules for the appointment of members to such committees.

ARTICLE VII - THE STAFF SENATE

  1. Authority
     
    1. The Staff Senate shall exercise general legislative powers for the staff.
       
    2. The Staff Senate shall have sole jurisdiction to select the Staff Employee of the Quarter and the Staff Employee of the Year.
       
    3. The Staff Senate will report to the Campus Council for informational and advisory purposes all legislation which it passes. Any legislation not within the sole jurisdiction of the Staff Senate shall be referred to the Campus Council for final action.
       
    4. The Staff Senate shall elect the staff members of the Campus Council as specified in Article VIII, Section B.1.c.
       
    5. The Staff Senate shall act as the official liaison for staff with the administration, faculty, and students. The Staff Senate may review items of interest or concern brought to it by staff, administrators, faculty, and students.
       
    6. The Chancellor may veto any action of the Staff Senate within 30 days of receipt of the action. He or she may suspend the action for 30 days and seek Campus Council advice before taking action on the legislation.
       
    7. At its next regular or special meeting after the Chancellor has vetoed legislation of the Staff Senate, the Staff Senate may, by a vote of at least three-fifths of those present and voting with a quorum present, appeal the matter to the President of the University. In this event, if the issue is not resolved within thirty days, the President shall submit the matter to the Board of Trustees.
       
    8. The Staff Senate may adopt amendments to Article VII subject to approval of the Board of Trustees, provided, however, that such amendments may not alter those areas of sole jurisdiction reserved to the Faculty Senate or the Student Senate nor the procedures outlined in paragraph 3 above.
       
  2. Membership
     
    1. Each member of the Staff Senate shall be a member of the staff (as defined in Article VI, Section B) and shall be based in Fayetteville.
       
    2. The voting membership of the Staff Senate shall consist of the Chair, the Vice Chair, and such others as provided in by-laws adopted by the Staff Senate.
       
    3. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Human Resources shall be a non-voting member of the Staff Senate.
       
  3. Officers and Duties
     
    1. The officers of the Staff Senate shall be the Chair and the Vice Chair, each to be elected as provided in by-laws adopted by the Staff Senate.
       
    2. The Chair of the Staff Senate shall:
      1. call, and preside over, meetings of the Staff Senate;
      2. act as spokesperson for the staff;
      3. be a member of the Campus Council;
      4. appoint staff members to University committees as provided in rules of the Staff Senate;
      5. appoint members to standing committees of the staff;
      6. establish ad hoc committees as deemed appropriate, appoint the members of such committees, and appoint persons or panels advisory to the Chair as deemed appropriate; and
      7. perform such other duties as the Chair deems appropriate to the office.
         
    3. Should the Chair of the Staff Senate be unable to complete the term of office, the Vice Chair of the Staff Senate shall become, for the unexpired term, Chair of the Staff Senate.
       
    4. The Vice Chair of the Staff Senate shall:
      1. assist with the duties of the Chair of the Staff Senate;
      2. act for the Chair of the Staff Senate at such times as the latter may be unable to perform his or her duties; and
      3. have such other duties and powers as provided in by-laws adopted by the Staff Senate.
         
    5. Should the office of the Vice Chair of the Staff Senate become vacant during the term of office, the Chair of the Staff Senate shall call a special meeting of the Staff Senate to elect a new Vice Chair for the unexpired term. Nominations shall be made from the floor, and all nominees shall be current members of the Staff Senate.
       
    6. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Human Resources shall appoint an individual from his or her office to serve as Recording Secretary and to provide clerical assistance to the Staff Senate and its officers.
       
  4. Meetings
     
    1. Regular meetings of the Staff Senate shall be held monthly, during regular office hours, and as provided in by-laws adopted by the Staff Senate.
       
    2. Special meetings of the Staff Senate may be called by the Chair, by a majority of the members of the Staff Senate, or otherwise as provided in by-laws adopted by the Staff Senate.
       
    3. A majority of the members of the Staff Senate shall constitute a quorum at any meeting. 4. Minutes of each regular and special meeting of the Staff Senate shall be promptly distributed by the Recording Secretary to all members of the Staff Senate, to the chairpersons of the Faculty Senate and the Student Senate, to the Chair of the Campus Council Agenda Committee, to the Chair of the Campus Council, to all vice chancellors, to the Chancellor, and to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Human Resources. Minutes shall be available for inspection by any interested person as provided in by-laws adopted by the Staff Senate.
       
  5. Committees
    1. The Staff Senate shall utilize the standing committees of the staff.
       
    2. The Staff Senate may establish appropriate ad hoc committees.
       
    3. The Staff Senate shall adopt rules to govern the appointment of staff to University committees.

ARTICLE VIII - THE CAMPUS COUNCIL

  1. Authority
     
    1. The Campus Council shall exercise general legislative powers in connection with all legislation not reserved to the sole jurisdiction of the Faculty Senate, the Student Senate, or the Staff Senate.
       
    2. All legislation initiated in the Faculty Senate, the Student Senate, or the Staff Senate shall be reported to the Campus Council for informational purposes. If the legislation is not within the sole jurisdiction of those bodies, it will require final action by the Campus Council for approval.
       
    3. The Campus Council may advise the Chancellor, the President of the University, and through the President, the Board of Trustees, on any matter of concern to the Campus Council including legislation reported by the Faculty Senate, the Staff Senate, and the Student Senate.
       
  2. Membership
     
    1. The voting membership of the Campus Council shall consist of the Chair of the Faculty Senate, the Vice Chair of the Faculty Senate, the ASG President, the President pro tempore of the Student Senate, the Chair of the Staff Senate, 16 additional faculty representatives as specified in paragraph a. below, 16 additional student representatives as specified in paragraph b. below, 16 additional staff representatives as specified in paragraph c. below, and administrative representatives as specified in paragraph d. below.
      1. The 16 additional faculty representatives shall be voting members of the Faculty Senate, and shall be elected for one-year terms by the Faculty Senate pursuant to its rules.
      2. The 16 additional student representatives shall be voting members of the Student Senate, and shall be elected for one-year terms by the Student Senate pursuant to its rules.
      3. The 16 additional staff representatives shall be voting members of the Staff Senate, and shall be elected for one-year terms by the Staff Senate pursuant to its rules.
      4. The administration representatives shall be the Dean of Students, the dean of each college or school (including the Graduate School and the Division of Continuing Education), and the dean (or director) of University libraries.
         
    2. Should a faculty, student, or staff representative be unable to complete the term of office, the senate which elected that person shall elect a replacement member to serve for the unexpired term.
       
    3. The Chancellor and all vice chancellors shall be non-voting members of the Campus Council.
       
  3. Officers and Duties
     
    1. The Campus Council shall elect its Chair and Vice Chair from its members.
       
    2. Should the Chair of the Campus Council be unable to complete the term of office, the Vice Chair shall become, for the unexpired term, Chair of the Campus Council.
       
    3. The Secretary of the Campus Council shall be appointed by the Chair of the Campus Council, but with voting privileges only if entitled thereto by virtue of election to the Campus Council.
       
    4. The duties of the officers of the Campus Council shall be those normally associated with their respective offices.
       
  4. Meetings
     
    1. The Campus Council shall meet at least once each semester, and at such additional times as the Chair of the Campus Council deems appropriate or upon call of the Chancellor.
       
    2. A meeting notice and tentative agenda shall be distributed by the Secretary to all members of the Campus Council, Faculty Senate, Student Senate, and Staff Senate, and to all members of the faculty, at least three business days in advance of each regular or special meeting.
       
    3. A majority of the voting members of the Campus Council shall constitute a quorum at any meeting. An action of the Campus Council shall require a simple majority vote of those present and voting, a quorum being present.
       
    4. Minutes of each regular and special meeting of the Campus Council shall be promptly distributed by the Secretary to all members of the Campus Council, to the chairpersons of the Faculty Senate, the Student Senate, and the Staff Senate, to all members of the faculty, to all vice chancellors and deans, and to the Chancellor. Minutes shall also be available in the office of the Secretary for inspection by any interested person, and shall be deposited in the office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs as the office of record.
       
  5. Committees
     
    1. The standing Agenda Committee shall consist of ten members. Three members shall be faculty members, three shall be staff members, three shall be students and one member shall represent the administration. The term of appointment shall be for one year. Members can be re-appointed.
      1. Any person represented on the Campus Council may submit to the Committee, through a member of the Council, proposed motions, reports, discussion items, or other business to be placed before the Council, with an appropriate rationale to accompany each such proposal. The Committee shall, before each of its meetings, call attention to this privilege by notice in a campus-wide publication.
      2. The Committee shall review each proposal submitted under the provisions of paragraph a. above, and may recommend that the proposal be changed or withdrawn by the initiator(s) thereof, who may accept or reject any such recommendation.
      3. The Committee shall review all legislation reported by the Faculty Senate, Student Senate, or Staff Senate. If final action is required by the Campus Council, the Committee shall include such items as top priority on the agenda for the next meeting of the Campus Council. If legislation reported by the Faculty Senate, Student Senate, or Staff Senate appears to the Committee to be legislation which rests within the sole jurisdiction of a Senate other than the one from which it was reported, it shall be promptly referred to the Senate with the sole jurisdiction over such legislation and shall be considered enacted only if approved by the Senate with sole jurisdiction.
      4. The Committee shall prepare, for each meeting of the Campus Council, a tentative agenda, consisting of a priority-ordered list of items. The agenda shall include all items submitted under the provisions of paragraph a. above and not subsequently withdrawn; any item(s) referred to the Campus Council for final action by the Faculty Senate, Student Senate, or Staff Senate; and such items as should be carried over from the agenda adopted at the preceding meeting of the Campus Council.
      5. The agenda prepared by the Committee shall be submitted to the Secretary of the Campus Council for distribution.
         
    2. The Campus Council shall utilize the standing committees of the faculty, students, staff, and administration as the Campus Council deems appropriate.
       
    3. The Campus Council may establish appropriate ad hoc committees. Provision shall be made for faculty, student, staff, and administration representatives on such committees unless the Campus Council deems such provision clearly inappropriate.
       
  6. Amendments to Article VIII
     
    1. The Campus Council may adopt amendments to Article VIII subject to approval of the Board of Trustees, provided, however, that such amendment may not alter those areas of sole jurisdiction reserved to the Faculty Senate, the Student Senate, or the Staff Senate.
       
    2. One or more proposed amendments to Article VIII may be presented to the Campus Council at any regular or special meeting. Any such proposal may be amended at the same meeting by majority vote of those present and voting, a quorum being present.
       
    3. A recommendation to amend Article VIII shall not be voted upon at the same Campus Council meeting at which the proposed amendment was presented. If such proposal is amended by the Campus Council, the amended proposal shall not be voted upon at the same meeting at which such proposal was amended.
       
    4. If approved by a majority of those present and voting at a regular or special meeting of the Campus Council, a quorum being present, such recommendation shall promptly be forwarded to the Chancellor with a request that it be promptly forwarded to the Board with the Chancellor's own recommendation regarding the proposed amendment.
       
    5. An amendment of Article VIII shall be effective from the time of its adoption by the Board of Trustees.

The Staff Senate has adopted by-laws, which are available, along with other information about the Staff Senate, on the Staff Senate web page at http://staffsenate.uark.edu/.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:36 PM

1.5 University Committees

University committees fall into two general categories: administration boards, committees and councils; and committees of the campus governance groups. Some Staff Senate committees include staff members who are not current senators, and there are also opportunities for staff to serve on several administration boards, committees, and councils as well as on some Campus Council committees. Information about the membership composition and the responsibilities of campus committees can be found at: http://www.uark.edu/admin/vcacsey/Governance.html.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:34 PM

2. Key Definitions

2.1 Faculty, Administrators, and Staff

(Board Policy 405.1)

There are, broadly defined, three categories of employees of the University: faculty, administrators, and staff.

Faculty are employees who hold the academic rank of lecturer, master lecturer, assistant instructor, instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, professor, distinguished professor, University professor, or one of these titles modified by clinical, research, adjunct, visiting, executive in residence, or emeritus, e.g., clinical professor, adjunct assistant professor.

Other titles which have faculty status and academic rank are dean of libraries, librarian, associate librarian, assistant librarian, curator, associate curator, assistant curator, instructional development specialist I and II, and extension specialist I, II, III, and IV. Extension specialists hold academic rank only when they are appointed in academic units.

Administrators are employees who hold the titles assistant director, associate director, director, assistant dean, associate dean, dean, assistant vice chancellor, associate vice chancellor, vice chancellor, assistant chancellor, associate chancellor, chancellor, or one of these titles modified by the term executive. Some administrators also hold faculty rank.

Staff are all employees of the University who are not faculty or administrators. Staff may be classified or non-classified.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:33 PM

2.2 Classified and Non-Classified Staff

All University titles are authorized by the Arkansas General Assembly in the campus biennial appropriations act and are designated as classified or non-classified.

Classified staff positions are grouped or classed, under the Arkansas Uniform Classification and Compensation Act, with positions that have similar duties and responsibilities and that require similar knowledge, abilities, skills, education, and experience. Each classification is assigned to one of thirty pay grades which has a minimum and a maximum pay level. Section 6.1 of this handbook provides more detailed information about the pay grades.

Non-Classified staff positions are not assigned to a pay grade, but each non-classified title has a maximum salary for each year of the biennium, called a line-item maximum, which is specified in the campus appropriations act. The actual pay for each non-classified position is determined by the University and department budget and by the employee's qualifications; it is not usually as high as the line-item maximum. Faculty titles and most administrative titles are also non-classified.

Thursday, April 29, 2010 12:48 PM

2.3 Appointed and Extra-Help Hourly Employees

University employees may be appointed or extra-help hourly. Both categories of employees may work full-time or part-time.

Appointed employees include faculty, staff, and administrators who are on salary and are paid once a month. If their appointments are half-time (50%) or greater, they are eligible to participate in the University's fringe benefits program.

Extra-Help Hourly employees are hired on a temporary, as-needed basis, are paid semi-monthly for the hours they actually work, and are not eligible to participate in the University's fringe benefits program. However, non-student extra-help hourly employees are eligible for pay for University holidays, equivalent to the number of hours per day they usually work, provided they work the scheduled day before and the scheduled day after a University holiday, and provided they usually work twenty hours (half-time) or more per week. Hourly employees may also participate in the University's retirement plan, although their contributions will not be matched. Undergraduate students taking 12 hours or more are not eligible to participate in the retirement plan. Extra-help hourly employees cannot work more than 1,500 hours in a fiscal year, which begins July 1. Both the employee and the hiring department will be notified before the 1,500 hour limit is reached and the employee will sign a letter of termination upon receiving the last paycheck allowable under the 1,500 hour limit.

Specifically, notices will be sent to the employee, the employee's immediate supervisor, and to the hiring department's representative who enters hourly time in BASIS, according to the following schedule:

  • 1100-1299 hours worked - E-mail notification will be sent to the employee, the employee's immediate supervisor, and to the hiring department's representative who enters hourly time in BASIS
     
  • 1300-1499 hours worked - Payroll will place a hold on the employee's paycheck and e-mail a form requiring the signatures of the employee and the employee's supervisor. When the form is returned, the hold will be removed from the paycheck and a manual check will be sent to the employee's department on payday.
     
  • 1500 hours worked - A letter terminating employment will be mailed to the employee. The employee's final paycheck will be held until the employee has signed and returned the letter.

All forms or letters may be faxed, scanned and e-mailed, or returned through campus mail.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:30 PM

2.4 Exempt and Non-Exempt Employees

Exempt and Non-Exempt Employees
(U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act - Public Law 99-150)

The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) designates state job titles as exempt or non-exempt under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Certain individuals may, because of the nature of their responsibilities, be exceptions to OPM's general designations. Human Resources can test specific positions for exempt or non-exempt status.

Exempt employees are those whose work is at least 80% executive, administrative, or professional. The Fair Labor Standards Act does not require them to be paid overtime for working more than 40 hours in a work week.

Non-Exempt employees are those who are covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act. They earn overtime compensation for hours worked in excess of 40 hours in any work week. For more information on overtime compensation, see Section 5.3 of this handbook.

 

Wednesday, June 16, 2010 9:27 AM

2.5 Professional and Consultant Services

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 312.0, 324.0)

Persons who provide professional and consultant services to the University on a one-time or short-term basis are not considered University employees. Their pay, including honoraria, is arranged through a Professional and Consultant Services Contract. See the Business Affairs web site at http://procurement.uark.edu/650.php for further details.

Friday, May 07, 2010 10:39 AM

2.6 Periods of Employment

Most University staff employees have twelve-month appointments. Many faculty and some staff have nine-month, or academic year, appointments. A few have appointments for other periods, including spring or fall semester appointments, summer appointments, or appointments for a specified period to coincide with a grant or project.

An appointment is not an employment contract. Administrative and staff employees may be terminated at any time or dismissed for cause under University procedures. See Section 10 of this handbook for further information about terminations.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:26 PM

3. General Employment Policies

3.1 Eligibility for Employment

(Immigration Reform and Control Act - Public Law 99-603; AHRMS Policy Manual, 120)

Employers are required by federal law to verify that every person hired after November 6, 1986, is authorized to work in the United States, using the Employment Eligibility Verification Form (Form I-9). If you are a new employee, you will be required to present documents that identify you and that verify your eligibility to work in this country and to complete an I-9 form.

Although the federal government may, from time to time, change the list of acceptable I-9 documents, the following are currently acceptable: Documents that can be used to prove your identity and your employment eligibility are: A United States passport, a certificate of United States citizenship, a certificate of naturalization, an unexpired foreign passport with attached employment authorization, an alien registration receipt card with photograph, an unexpired temporary resident card, an unexpired employment authorization card, an unexpired reentry permit, an unexpired refugee travel document, or an unexpired employment authorization document issued by the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services (BCIS) which contains a photograph.

Substitute documents that can be used to prove your identity only are: A state-issued driver's license or i.d. card with a photograph or information that includes your name, address, sex, date of birth, height, and color of eyes; an i.d. card issued by a federal, state, or local government agency or entity with a photograph or information that includes your name, address, date of birth, sex, height, and eye color; a school i.d. card with a photograph; a voter's registration card; a U.S. military card or draft record; a military dependent's i.d. card; a U.S. Coast Guard Merchant Mariner Card; a Native American tribal document; a driver's license issued by a Canadian government authority; or, if you are under eighteen and unable to present one of the preceding documents: A school record or report card; a clinic, doctor, or hospital record; or a day-care or nursery school record.

Substitute documents that can be used to prove your employment eligibility only are: A social security card issued by the Social Security Administration; a Certificate of Birth Abroad issued by the Department of State; an original or certified copy of a birth certificate issued by a state, county, municipal authority, or outlying possession of the United States bearing an official seal; a Native American tribal document; a U.S. Citizen i.d. card; an i.d. card for use of Resident Citizen in the United States; or an unexpired employment authorization document issued by the BCIS.

Your department can help you complete the I-9 and other forms, including the University's Acknowledgment of Policies form and the W-4 tax-withholding form, that should be completed and signed on or before your first day of employment. These forms should be completed and submitted before you begin work for the University and must be submitted to Human Resources before the University can release a paycheck to you. You may download the I-9 form and others from the Human Resources web site, or complete the forms in Human Resources, if that is more convenient. Non-resident aliens must complete their W-4 forms in Human Resources to ensure compliance with Internal Revenue Service regulations.

 

Friday, May 07, 2010 10:41 AM

3.2 Arkansas Right to Work Law

(Amendment 34 to the Arkansas Constitution, Board Policy 460.1)

The Arkansas Constitution protects you against discrimination in employment because of your membership or non-membership in a labor union. Specifically, the constitution provides that:

No person shall be denied employment because of membership or affiliation with or resignation from a labor union, or because of refusal to join or affiliate with a labor union; nor shall any corporation or individual or association of any kind enter into any contract, written or oral, to exclude from employment members of a labor union or persons who refuse to join a labor union, or because of resignation from a labor union; nor shall any person against his will be compelled to pay dues to any labor organization as a prerequisite to or condition of employment.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:23 PM

3.3 Age Requirements

(U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act; Age Discrimination in Employment Act; Arkansas Code Annotated §11-6-110 et seq.)

The minimum age for employment in most University positions is sixteen years. However, applicants younger than sixteen with a valid work permit may be employed. Employees who hold hazardous jobs must be eighteen years of age or older. No one under the age of 18 may work more than six days in any week, more than 54 hours in any week, more than ten hours in a 24-hour period or before 6:00 am or after 11:00 pm. Public safety officers must be age twenty-one or older. There is no maximum age for employment and no mandatory retirement age.

3.3 Updated 2/20/2010

Friday, April 30, 2010 12:22 PM

3.4 Personnel Records

Personnel Records
(Arkansas Freedom of Information Act - Arkansas Code Ann. §25-19-101 et seq.; Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 207.0)

You have the right to examine and copy the information contained in your own personnel file. Official personnel records for all classified employees are maintained in University of Arkansas Human Resources, where you may view your own file at any time during regular business hours. Your department may also maintain personnel records. If so, you have the right to view your own file at any time during regular business hours. Your designated representative may also view your personnel files.

Your personnel records may also be viewed by University officials who have a legitimate need to review them, such as your supervisor, your prospective supervisor if you have applied for a promotion or transfer, persons involved in the investigation or settlement of a formal grievance or complaint filed by an employee, and attorneys and others who are investigating state workers' compensation claims.

Under the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act, any citizen of the State of Arkansas may inspect and copy personnel records except to the extent that disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Before others are allowed to inspect or copy your files, the following types of information will be removed: social security and income tax information, medical and insurance information, information about retirement annuities, information about family and marital and parental status, unlisted telephone numbers and addresses not intended for publication, and scholastic or academic records. Your evaluation or job performance records, including your performance evaluations, are disclosed only if there has been a final administrative resolution of a suspension or termination proceeding at which the records formed the basis for the suspension or termination, and there is a compelling public interest in their disclosure.

Within twenty-four hours of receiving a request for inspection of your personnel records, the University must determine whether the records are subject to disclosure and notify you of the request and the determination. You may seek an opinion immediately from the Attorney General about whether the records are subject to disclosure.

In the event of a law enforcement or agency investigation in which your personnel records are relevant, they made be made available to University attorneys and others involved in the investigation or litigation. Your records may also be made available in response to a lawfully issued subpoena or court order.

3.4 Updated 2/20/2010

Friday, April 30, 2010 12:21 PM

3.5 Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity

( University of Arkansas Affirmative Action Plan and various state and federal laws and executive orders; Governor's Policy Directive #8; Act 653 of 2003) 

University of Arkansas Non-Discrimination Policy

It is the policy of the University of Arkansas to provide an educational and work environment in which thought, creativity, and growth are stimulated, and in which individuals are free to realize their full potential through equal opportunity. The university should be a place of work and study for students, faculty, and staff, which is free of all forms of discrimination, sexual intimidation and exploitation. Therefore, it is the policy of the University of Arkansas, to prohibit discrimination of its students, faculty, and staff and to make every effort to eliminate discrimination within the university community.

Therefore, the University of Arkansas is committed to providing equal opportunity for all students and applicants for admission and for all employees and applicants for employment regardless of race, age, gender, religion, national origin, marital or parental status, disability, veteran status or sexual orientation. In addition, discrimination in employment on the basis of genetic information is prohibited.

It is the responsibility of the University of Arkansas' Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance to investigate and resolve all allegations of discrimination on the basis of race, age, gender, national origin, religion, disability, veteran status, marital or parental status, and sexual orientation.  For more information or to report allegations of discrimination, contact: Jenifer S. Tucker, Compliance Officer, Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance, Phone: 479-575-4019.

This policy will be followed in recruiting, hiring, determination of pay, promotions, University-sponsored training programs, transfers, layoffs, returns from layoff, demotions, terminations, social and recreational programs, use of University facilities, fringe benefits, and treatment as individuals. It is to be implemented throughout the campus and is the responsibility of all departments and all personnel, supervisory and non-supervisory. Compliance with this policy shall be monitored by the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance.

In the vocabulary of equal employment opportunity, affirmative action signifies a positive, continuing, result-oriented program developed by an employer to assure meaningful employment opportunities to all segments of the community and more specifically to minority group members, women, and others who have been discriminated against in the past. It contrasts with simple non-discrimination which implies a more passive observance of equal opportunity. The concept of affirmative action assumes that discrimination in employment is likely to be a structural problem built into policies and practices which on the surface do not appear to be discriminatory, but which in fact have created barriers to employment and promotion for women and minority groups. The Affirmative Action Plan sets forth specific result-oriented procedures to which the University commits itself in order to overcome such institutional barriers to equal employment opportunity. It also establishes an organizational structure for developing future goals and procedures and for assuring that all efforts are made to meet these goals on an on-going basis.

The University commits itself to a policy of equal employment opportunity and to a program of affirmative action not solely because of legal requirements, but because it believes that such practices are basic to human dignity.

Further information about the University's affirmative action programs and about state and federal laws prohibiting discrimination is available in the Office of Affirmative Action.

3.5 Updated 2/20/2010

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 8:45 AM

3.6 Sexual Harassment
(Adopted by the Campus Council, February 17, 1994; amended, March 17, 1994)

Policy Statement

It is the policy of the University of Arkansas to provide an educational and work environment in which thought, creativity, and growth are stimulated, and in which individuals are free to realize their full potential. The university should be a place of work and study for students, faculty, and staff, which is free of all forms of sexual intimidation and exploitation. Therefore, it is the policy of the University of Arkansas to prohibit sexual harassment of its students, faculty, and staff and to make every effort to eliminate sexual harassment in the university.

The university's prohibition of sexual harassment applies to members of the university community, to visitors to the campus, and to contractors and others who do business with the university or who use university facilities. The policy prohibiting sexual harassment applies regardless of the gender of the harasser or of the person being harassed. The policy applies to sexual harassment that takes place in any relationship, including both those involving a power differential and those between peers, colleagues, and co-workers. The university policy prohibits sexual harassment between or among students, faculty, staff, and others visiting or conducting official business on campus, and in all areas of the university's work and educational environments.

Sexual harassment of employees is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sexual harassment of students is a violation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. These laws apply to both the university and to individuals. Those who engage in sexual harassment may be subject to legal consequences, including civil and criminal penalties and monetary damages.

Sexual harassment subverts the mission of the university and threatens the careers, educational experience, and well being of students, faculty, staff, and visitors to the campus. In both obvious and subtle ways, sexual harassment is destructive to individual students, faculty, staff, and the academic community as a whole. Sexual harassment blurs the boundary between professional and personal relationships by introducing a conflicting personal element into what should be a professional situation. When, through fear of reprisal, a student, staff member, or faculty member submits or is pressured to submit to unwanted sexual attention, the university's ability to carry out its mission is seriously undermined.

Sexual harassment is especially destructive when it threatens relationships between teachers and students or supervisors and subordinates. Through control over grades, salary decisions, changes in duties or work loads, recommendations for graduate study, promotion, and the like, a teacher or supervisor can have a decisive influence on a student's, staff member's, or faculty member's career at the university and beyond. Sexual harassment in such situations constitutes an abuse of the power inherent in a faculty member's or supervisor's position.

Definitions

Sexual harassment as defined by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and adapted to the academic environment consists of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct or written communication of a sexual nature, regardless of where such conduct might occur, when:

(1) submission to the conduct is made either implicitly or explicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment with the university or of an individual's academic status or advancement in a university program, course, or activity;

(2) submission to or rejection of the conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting that individual; and/or

(3) the conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or learning environment.

Sexual harassment is distinguished from voluntary sexual relationships in that it introduces such elements as coercion, threat, unwanted sexual attention, and/or promises of academic or professional rewards in exchange for sexual favors. Sexual harassment is unwelcome behavior. Behavior that the courts have found to constitute sexual harassment is usually repeated or continues even after the individual makes it clear that it is unwanted.

Sexual harassment is often divided into two categories: (1) quid pro quo harassment and (2) harassment resulting from a hostile or abusive environment.

Quid pro quo harassment involves an explicit or implied exchange; that is, the granting or denial of a benefit or privilege in exchange for sexual considerations. The harasser uses submission to or rejection of the offensive conduct as the basis for decisions such as employment, promotion, transfer, selection for training, performance evaluation, or the basis for academic evaluation or recommendations.

Court decisions have established that a hostile or abusive working or learning environment may also constitute sexual harassment. While the exact definitions and limits of a hostile or abusive environment continue to be delineated by the courts, case law indicates that such an environment exists when the workplace or educational environment is permeated by discriminatory intimidation, insults, and ridicule, such as sexual innuendos, uninvited sexual advances, sexually suggestive or discriminatory remarks, sexually suggestive or offensive signs, graffiti, or pictures, the use of sexually crude and vulgar language, etc. The U.S. Supreme Court has held that, to constitute sexual harassment, the offensive conduct must be sufficiently severe and pervasive that a reasonable person would find the conditions of the working or learning environment to have been adversely affected. The employee or student must also subjectively perceive the environment to be hostile or abusive. However, it is not necessary that an employee's or student's psychological well being be seriously affected or that she or he suffer injury for a discriminatorily hostile or abusive environment to exist. One utterance of an offensive epithet does not by itself constitute sexual harassment. The Supreme Court has indicated that whether an environment is hostile or abusive can be determined only by looking at all the circumstances, which may include the frequency of the discriminatory conduct; its severity; whether it is physically threatening or humiliating, or a mere offensive utterance; and whether it unreasonably interferes with an employee's work performance or a student's learning.

Examples of behavior that may constitute sexual harassment are included in Appendix A.

Academic Freedom

Works of art and literature, readings, and other written, auditory, or visual course materials which are used in an educational context, including classrooms, academic offices, and all other learning environments, or which are part of academic or cultural programs, do not constitute sexual harassment, regardless of their sexual, erotic, suggestive, or vulgar content and regardless of whether they may be offensive to some individuals.

Consensual Relationships

Consensual sexual relationships between faculty and their students or between supervisors and their employees in some instances may result in charges of sexual harassment.

Consensual relationships may lead other faculty and students or supervisors and coworkers to question the validity of grades, evaluations, and other interactions between the people involved in such a relationship. The integrity of the work of both people in the relationship may be compromised.

University faculty, administrators, and other supervisory staff should be aware that any sexual involvement with their students or employees could subject them to formal action if a sexual harassment complaint is subsequently made and substantiated, and that they bear the greater burden of responsibility should it be proven that the power differential between them made the relationship other than fully consensual. Even when both parties have consented to a relationship, it is the faculty member, administrator, or supervisor who may be held accountable for unprofessional behavior. Other students or employees may allege that the relationship creates a hostile or abusive environment affecting them. Graduate assistants, residence hall staff, tutors, and undergraduate course assistants who are professionally responsible for students will be held to the same standards of accountability as faculty in their relationships with students whom they instruct or evaluate.

When a consensual relationship exists between a student and a faculty member who has control over the student's academic work or status or between an employee and his or her supervisor, the resulting conflict of interest should be addressed in accordance with university policies concerning conflict of interest.

Responsibility to Report

Any student, faculty member, staff member, administrator, or visitor to the campus who has experienced or witnessed sexual harassment is strongly urged to report it. The university must know about incidents of sexual harassment in order to stop them, protect victims, and prevent future incidents.

It is the responsibility of university faculty, administrators, and supervisors to report complaints of sexual harassment which they receive and of possible sexual harassment of which they become aware. When there is a relationship that involves legally recognized professional confidentiality between the complainant and the person to whom the harassment is reported, the report may be withheld at the request of the complainant.

Timeframe for Reporting

Sexual harassment should be reported immediately and must be reported within 180 days of its occurrence. However, under compelling circumstances, a delayed report of sexual harassment may be made, provided it is made within 180 days after a student has graduated from the university or 180 days after an employee has left his or her current position at the university.

Retaliation Prohibited

University policy and federal law prohibit any form of retaliation against a person who makes a sexual harassment complaint, participates in an investigation of sexual harassment, or participates in formal grievance or disciplinary procedures. Retaliation against a complainant or witness is, in itself, a violation of university policy and the law, and is a serious separate offense.

False Reports of Sexual Harassment

Willfully making a false report of sexual harassment is a violation of university policy and is a serious offense. Any person who willfully makes or participates in making a false or frivolous report of sexual harassment will be subject to disciplinary action.

Reporting System

Students, faculty members, administrators, staff members, or visitors to the university may report allegations of sexual harassment to an official (hereinafter referred to as the "compliance officer") who is designated by, and who reports to, the Chancellor. They may discuss with the compliance officer any situation that they believe may constitute sexual harassment. Reports may be made by the person experiencing the harassment or by a third party, such as a witness to the harassment or someone who is told of the harassment. The compliance officer is Jenifer Tucker. Ms. Tucker's telephone number is (479) 575-4019.

Investigation of Complaints

The compliance officer must investigate every allegation of sexual harassment, including third-party reports. The investigation shall be appropriate to the complaint, taking into consideration its seriousness, the extent to which it is or can be substantiated, and the nature of the resolution desired by the complainant. An initial review to determine whether an investigation is warranted must be initiated within five working days or as soon as possible after the complaint is made.

Upon receiving a complaint, the compliance officer will interview the complainant (and the individual allegedly experiencing the conduct if it is a third-party report) to compile as much specific information as possible, including the nature of each incident, the time, place, actual or potential witnesses, any actions or other responses to the alleged harassment already taken by the complainant, identification of the alleged harasser, and other pertinent facts or allegations.

The compliance officer will explain the university's obligation to investigate and take appropriate corrective action. The compliance officer will present options for resolution of the complaint, including actions that the aggrieved person can take and methods of informal resolution. The compliance officer will offer information about the availability of counseling and other assistance, as appropriate to the situation.

The compliance officer will meet with the person accused of sexual harassment and present the allegations, indicating whether there are witnesses or other evidence that would appear to substantiate the charge. The alleged harasser may make an initial response to the allegations. If the issue is not resolved at that point or if the compliance officer determines that an investigation is warranted, the compliance officer will proceed with an investigation.

Deans, department heads, chairpersons, directors, and other administrators who are responsible for personnel matters will participate with the compliance officer, as appropriate, in investigating charges of sexual harassment and in the process of resolution of sexual harassment complaints.

Individuals who make complaints of sexual harassment and individuals who are accused of sexual harassment are entitled to a fair and prompt resolution of the complaint that is consistent with the principles of due process. Resolution may be attempted through direct informal action, through an informal resolution process, or through a formal complaint process.

Informal Resolution Process

After the compliance officer has discussed the complaint with the complainant and informed the person against whom a complaint has been made, the complainant may choose to attempt to resolve the matter by addressing the person directly. The compliance officer can suggest methods and models (e.g., writing a letter describing the offensive behavior and its effects on the complainant and requesting that the behavior cease).

 

If the complainant wishes to attempt to resolve the problem informally, the compliance officer may serve as a mediator, or otherwise assist both parties in coming to an understanding and resolving the problem, with a focus on changing current and future behavior. The compliance officer may take statements or review records from either party and from any witnesses that either party identifies, but the main focus will be on resolution and conciliation. Deans, department heads, chairpersons, directors, or other administrators will be involved, as appropriate, in the informal resolution process.

Formal Complaint Procedure

If either party is not satisfied with the result of the informal process or if the complainant chooses, instead, to use a formal University of Arkansas complaint procedure, the compliance officer will help identify the appropriate procedure and explain how to use it. At the discretion of the compliance officer, records concerning the matter may be made available to parties, witnesses, or administrators, as necessary, to properly conduct the investigation during the formal complaint procedure.

If a formal complaint is initiated, at the conclusion of the process, both parties will be informed in writing of the findings of the investigation and reminded of the university's relevant policies, including policies prohibiting retaliation.

In some instances, it may not be possible to determine whether sexual harassment has occurred. Allegations of sexual harassment that are not substantiated are not necessarily false allegations.

Disclosure

Subject to the other provisions of this policy and the requirements of law, every possible effort will be made to ensure that any information received as part of the University's resolution and complaint procedures is treated discreetly. All parties to the complaint will be asked to assist in treating the complaint confidentially. The university's obligation to investigate and to prevent claims of sexual harassment means that it is not possible to guarantee that complaints of sexual harassment will be handled confidentially.

In the interests of fairness and problem resolution, disclosure of complaints and their substance and the results of investigations and complaint procedures, except as compelled by law, will be limited to the immediate parties and other appropriate administrative officials or as necessary to conduct a full and impartial investigation.

Disciplinary Action

Disciplinary action up to and including termination (employees) or dismissal (students) may be taken against persons found to have engaged in sexual harassment or found to have willfully made a false or frivolous accusation of sexual harassment. The specific disciplinary action will be determined by the nature and seriousness of the offense. In all cases where disciplinary action is recommended, pertinent procedures in the Staff Handbook, the Faculty Handbook, the applicable student catalog or handbook and/or the applicable university policies are to be followed.

If a thorough investigation of a complaint substantiates that formal disciplinary action is warranted because either sexual harassment has occurred or a false report of sexual harassment has been made, the compliance officer will report the findings to the appropriate vice chancellor, the Dean of Students, or the Dean of the Graduate School, who is responsible for initiating disciplinary action. Any disciplinary action is subject to all applicable University policies. The disciplinary action shall be implemented within 30 days of the notification to the vice chancellor or dean. The compliance officer will monitor the implementation of the disciplinary process and its timeliness.

Record Keeping

Investigation records will be kept in employee personnel files only if a complaint of sexual harassment is substantiated and disciplinary action is taken. All other investigation records will be kept only for statistical purposes and to document that the university has responded to complaints. This provision shall not prevent the retention of personnel records where a finding of a violation of the University's Sexual Harassment Policy was not sustained but where administrative action was determined to be appropriate.

Records maintained by the compliance officer to document that the university has responded to all complaints include information concerning the receipt of the complaint, the notification of the person against whom a complaint is made as well as his or her response, the steps taken to investigate the complaint, and indicate whether the complaint was substantiated. All written statements obtained, as well as summaries of witness interviews, will be included in the documentation. If the complaint is substantiated, the records will document actions taken to stop the harassment and to remedy its effects. If the complaint is not substantiated, all records pertaining to the complaint will be marked and treated as confidential, except as required by law or to the extent pertinent to investigation of any subsequent matters.

Statistical Review

The compliance officer will meet with the Chancellor when deemed necessary by the compliance officer to review any complaints or concerns arising under this policy.

Training

All organizational units must make reasonable efforts to provide sexual harassment training for their employees each year. All new employees should receive a copy of the Sexual Harassment Policy and sexual harassment training within the first six months of beginning employment. All employees should receive refresher training from the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance or its designee every three years.

Appendix A

The following are some examples of behavior that the courts have found to constitute either quid pro quo or hostile atmosphere sexual harassment. The list is not inclusive; other behaviors not included on the list may be sexual harassment. And most of the behaviors listed, if they are welcome by the person at whom they are directed, would not be sexual harassment. An important distinction is that sexual harassment must be unwelcome.

Sexual harassment can take many forms. Most sexual harassment falls into three categories: verbal, physical, and written or visual.

Verbal sexual harassment may include, but is not limited to:

  • sexual innuendoes, comments, and suggestive remarks about clothing, a person's body, or sexual activities;
  • suggestive or insulting sounds;
  • whistling in a suggestive manner;
  • humor and jokes about sex;
  • sexual propositions, invitations, or other pressure for sex; and
  • implied or overt threats.

In most cases, a single offensive epithet would not constitute sexual harassment.

Physical sexual harassment may include, but is not limited to:

  • patting, pinching, feeling, or any other intentional inappropriate touching;
  • brushing against the body;
  • making obscene or offensive gestures;
  • attempted or actual kissing or fondling;
  • coerced sexual intercourse; and
  • assault. (See the University of Arkansas Sexual Assault Policy)

Written or visual sexual harassment may occur when the following types of materials are directed to a specific individual or when people cannot reasonably avoid seeing them (the list is not inclusive):

  • pictures or drawings of a sexual nature;
  • sexually derogatory pin ups, posters, cartoons, magazines, or calendars;
  • messages, words, comments, rhymes, or other writing of a sexually derogatory or suggestive nature.

NOTE: Some of the forms of harassment described above may constitute criminal behavior.

 

 

 

Wednesday, July 25, 2012 8:47 AM

3.7 Sexual Assault

(Adopted by the Campus Council, September 23, 1993)

 Policy Statement

It is the policy of the University of Arkansas to prohibit sexual assault and to prevent sex offenses committed against students, employees, visitors to the campus, and other persons who use University facilities.

Sexual assault is an extreme form of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is prohibited by University policy and is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Sexual assault is also a crime, defined by the Arkansas criminal code.

Definitions

Sexual assault may include any involuntary sexual act which a person is threatened, coerced, or forced to engage in against her or his will. Sexual assault may be committed by a stranger or by an acquaintance.

Acts defined as sexual assault include rape, date rape, acquaintance rape, and gang rape, but may also include sexual touching of another person against his or her will, and forcing an unwilling person to touch another person sexually.

Sexual assault occurs when such acts are committed either by force, threat, or intimidation, or through the use of the victim's mental or physical helplessness, of which the assailant was aware or should have been aware.

Responsibility to Report

Any student, faculty member, staff member, administrator, or visitor to the campus who has experienced or witnessed sexual assault should report the assault immediately to the University Police (Department of Public Safety). If the assault occurred outside the jurisdiction of University Police, they will assist in reporting it to the proper authorities.

Sexual assault may also be reported to the Fayetteville police, if it occurred within the city limits, or to the police of another municipality if the assault occurred within another township or city which has a police force. It may be reported to the Washington County Sheriff's Department if it occurred outside city limits but within the county. Sexual assault may also be reported to the community Rape Crisis Help Line.

Preserving Evidence

It is important that evidence of sexual assault be preserved, because it may be necessary as proof in a criminal case. Victims and others should not alter the scene of the attack. The victim should not change clothes or take a bath before calling the police or Rape Crisis. The victim should be taken to a local hospital which has kits to collect and preserve evidence of rape and sexual assault.

Availability of Counseling

Counseling and other mental health services for victims of sexual assault are available on campus and in the community. Students and employees may use the Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) unit of the University Health Center. The Psychological Clinic of the Department of Psychology may be able to provide assistance in some cases. Community mental health agencies, such as the Ozark Guidance Center, and counselors and psychotherapists in private practice in the area can provide individual and group therapy. The Rape Crisis Help Line may make referrals for individual counseling and support groups.

Education and Awareness Programs

The Sexual Health Education Coordinator in the Department of Health Promotion and Education of the University of Arkansas Health Center is responsible for planning and coordinating campus education and awareness programs about all forms of sexual assault, including rape, acquaintance rape, and other sex offenses. Programs are presented regularly throughout the academic year in residence halls, fraternities, sororities, and for student organizations, academic classes, and in other settings that are likely to reach people throughout the campus community. Campus wide education and awareness activities are also conducted during Sexual Assault Prevention Week.

Other campus resources for sexual assault awareness, education, and prevention include the peer education group Sexual Harassment and Rape Prevention (SHARP), and the Sexual Assault Victim Advocacy and Education Program (SAVE), sponsored by Rape Crisis, the University Health Center, and the Alliance for Women's Concerns. A peer education course in sexual assault prevention will be offered, starting in the Spring of 1994.

University Judicial System

When appropriate, the University Police (Department of Public Safety) or any member of the University community may refer allegations of sexual assault to the University judicial system. The judicial system, which is described in the Undergraduate Studies Catalog, provides a just and equitable process for dealing with alleged infractions by students of University rules, regulations, or laws. The system is informal and non adversarial, and is intended to educate students, to help them make responsible decisions, and to be accountable for their actions.

In some instances, it may be appropriate for University faculty and staff members to use the University's formal grievance procedures to address grievances related to allegations of sexual assault. The faculty grievance procedure is described in the University of Arkansas Faculty Handbook.. The staff grievance procedure is described in the Staff Handbook.

During University judicial proceedings and grievance procedures, both the accuser and the person accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present. Both the accuser and the person accused shall be informed of the outcome of any campus judicial proceeding or grievance procedure in which sexual assault is alleged.

Disciplinary Action

Students and employees who are convicted of sexual assault may also be subject to university disciplinary action. According to the circumstances of the case, possible sanctions may range from a formal reprimand to dismissal from the University.

Victims of sexual assault may receive assistance in making reasonable changes in their work, academic, or living situations. Students may request assistance in changing their living situations from Residence Life and Dining Services. Requests for academic changes should be directed to the dean of the appropriate college. Staff may request assistance in changing their work situations from their supervisors or from the Department of Human Resources. Requests for such changes will be considered on the basis of their appropriateness and whether the requested change is reasonably available.

 

Coordination of Responses to Alleged Sexual Assault

The University has designated the University Compliance Officer, Ms. Jenifer Tucker, as its Title IX Coordinator, with overall responsibility for oversight of the University's compliance with its obligations under Title IX, including, but not limited to, its obligations to investigate and respond to allegations of sexual assault.

Ms. Jenifer Tucker
University Compliance Officer
346 N. West Avenue (West Avenue Annex)
479- 575-4019

For allegations of sexual assault by faculty, staff or other persons (other than students), the Title IX Coordinator coordinates with UAPD and the University Health Center to ensure that allegations of sexual assault reported to University officials are investigated and that confirmed allegations are addressed through University personnel processes, as appropriate.

For allegations of sexual assault by students, the Director of the University's Office of Academic Integrity & Student Conduct, Dr. Monica Holland, coordinates with UAPD and the University Health Center to ensure that allegations of sexual assault reported to University officials are investigated and that allegations are processed through the University student judicial process, as appropriate. The Director of the Office of Academic Integrity & Student Conduct reports to the Associate Dean of Students, and provides information reports to the University Title IX Coordinator on all allegations of sexual assault processed through the judicial process.

Dr. Monica Holland
Director, Office of Academic Integrity & Student Conduct
Arkansas Union 634
479-575-5170

 

Thursday, August 18, 2011 8:51 AM

3.8 Drug-Free Workplace

(U.S. Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988; Governor's Executive Order 89-2; approved by the Campus Council, April 27, 1989)

State agencies, boards, commissions, and institutions are required to certify that they are in compliance with the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988. If you were hired in May, 1989 or later, you were asked, on or before your first day of work, to read and sign an acknowledgment of receipt of information about the University's drug-free workplace policy. The text of that policy follows:

Drug Free Workplace Policy

Drug abuse and use at the workplace are subjects of immediate concern in our society. These problems are extremely complex and ones for which there are no easy solutions. From a safety perspective, the users of drugs may impair the well-being of all employees, the public at large, and result in damage to state property. Therefore, it is the policy of the State of Arkansas that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance in a state agency's or institution's workplace is prohibited. Any employees violating this policy will be subject to discipline up to and including termination. The specifics of this policy are as follows:

State agencies will not differentiate between drug users and drug pushers or sellers. Any employee who gives or in any way transfers a controlled substance while on the job or on agency premises will be subject to discipline up to and including termination.

The term "controlled substance" means any drug listed in 21 U.S.C. Section 812 and other federal regulations. Generally, these are drugs which have a high potential for abuse. Such drugs include, but are not limited to, heroin, marijuana, cocaine, PCP, and "crack." They also include legal drugs which are not prescribed for the individual using them by a licensed physician.

Each employee is required by law to inform the University within five days after he or she is convicted for violation of any federal or state criminal drug statute where such violation occurred on the University's premises. A conviction means a finding of guilt (including a plea of nolo contendere) or the imposition of a sentence by a judge or jury in any federal court, state court, or other court of competent jurisdiction.

The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, must notify the U.S. government agency with which the contract was made within ten days after receiving notice from the employee or otherwise receiving actual notice of such a conviction.

If an employee is convicted of violating any criminal drug statute while in the workplace, he or she will be subject to discipline up to and including termination. Alternatively, the University may require the employee to successfully finish a drug abuse program sponsored by an approved private or governmental institution.

As a condition of further employment on any federal government contract, the law requires all employees to abide by this policy.
Note: At the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, sections 3 and 4 of the Drug Free Workplace Policy will be carried out by requiring the convicted employee to inform his or her department head, director, or other appropriate supervisor of the conviction immediately and by having that supervisor report the conviction immediately to the vice chancellor to whom she or he reports. The vice chancellor so notified will convey the information, on behalf of the University, within the required ten-day period, to the U.S. agency with whom the federal contract in question is held.

Further information about controlled substances and about the health risks associated with the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs is available from Human Resources and the University Health Center. Information about locally-available sources of substance-abuse counseling is available from the University Health Center and from the Employee Assistance Program.

3.8 Updated 2/20/2010

Friday, April 30, 2010 12:06 PM

3.9 Alcohol Use

(Board Policy 705.2; Governor's Policy Directive #5;)

Possession and use of alcoholic beverages in public areas of University facilities (including organized houses) and at official University student functions held on campus must follow state and federal laws and University policies at all times. For employees, the possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages on University property or during working hours, reporting to work under the influence of alcohol, and intoxication while on duty are prohibited, and will result in disciplinary action up to and including termination. Under the Governor's policy directive, use of alcoholic beverages during office hours is strictly prohibited and shall be grounds for immediate dismissal. Information about laws relating to alcohol possession and use is available from Human Resources. Information about the health consequences of alcohol use and about locally-available sources of alcohol-abuse counseling is available from the University Health Center.

3.9 Updated 2/20/2010

Friday, April 30, 2010 12:04 PM

3.10 Smoking

(Ark. Code Ann. §§ 6-60-801 to -807; Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 724.0)

The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, is a tobacco-free campus.

It is the policy of the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville to promote the health, well-being and safety of students, faculty, staff and visitors while they are on the campus. Tobacco use and second-hand smoke have been identified by the Surgeon General to be the cause of preventable diseases. Each year, approximately 440,000 people die prematurely of diseases caused by smoking, accounting for one out of five deaths in the United States (CDC 2003.) Use of cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigars, pipes and other tobacco products lead to disease and death. In addition to causing direct health hazards, smoking and smokeless tobacco use contribute to institutional costs in other ways, including fire damage, cleaning and maintenance costs and costs associated with employee and student absenteeism, health care and medical insurance.

Accordingly, the University of Arkansas actively seeks to create a campus environment that is completely free of tobacco use and second-hand smoke.  Furthermore, the Arkansas Clean Air on Campus Act prohibits smoking on each campus of state-supported institutions of higher education.

You are prohibited from smoking or using other tobacco products (including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco and other tobacco products), as well as the use of electronic cigarettes,  at all times on property owned and operated by the University of Arkansas, including on and within vehicles on University property.  If you are on or within a University vehicle, you are prohibited from smoking or using other tobacco products at any location.    

Campus-controlled advertising of, as well as the sale or free sampling of, tobacco products is prohibited on campus. Littering the campus with remains of tobacco products or any other disposable product is also prohibited. Campus organizations are discouraged from accepting gifts from tobacco companies.

All individuals attending public events, such as conferences, meetings, public lectures, social events, cultural events and sporting events using University facilities are required to abide by the University's smoking and tobacco use policy and state law. Organizers of such events are responsible for communicating the policy to attendees and for enforcing the policy.

The University of Arkansas is committed to support all students, faculty and staff who wish to stop using tobacco products. Assistance to students, faculty, and staff to overcome addiction to tobacco products is available through the University Health Center and Human Resources.

All University of Arkansas students, faculty, staff, contractors and visitors to campus are expected to comply with the University's smoking and tobacco use policy and state law.    You are empowered to respectfully inform others about the policy to enhance awareness and encourage compliance and may report violations to the University of Arkansas Police Department (UAPD).  You may not be retaliated or discriminated against for making a complaint or furnishing information to UAPD concerning a violation of this policy.

Pursuant to state law, UAPD may issue a citation for smoking on campus with a fine of not less than $100 and not more than $500.  Employees engaging in other use of tobacco products or electronic cigarettes will be referred to their respective units for progressive discipline.  

 

 

Friday, August 27, 2010 11:52 AM

3.11 Workplace Violence

FAYETTEVILLE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 416.0
Workplace Violence Policy
The University of Arkansas is committed to providing a safe, healthful workplace that is free
from violence or threats of violence. Reports of threatening or violent incidents are taken
seriously and dealt with appropriately. Individuals who engage in violent or threatening
behavior may be removed from the premises, and may be subject to dismissal or other
disciplinary action, arrest and/or criminal prosecution.
Prohibited Behavior
The University does not tolerate behavior that:
1. Is violent
2. Threatens violence
3. Harasses or intimidates others
4. Interferes with an individual's legal rights of movement or expression
5. Disrupts the workplace, the academic environment or the University's
ability to provide service to the public.
Violent or threatening behavior can include physical acts, oral or written statements, or gestures
and expressions.
Reporting and Action
Guidelines for Immediate Response:
When confronted by an individual who may believe that you have wronged him/her and he/she
will shoot you, consider the following:
1. Remember that he/she believes that you and maybe others hold him/her in lower esteem
than he/she deserves. Recent research has found that these people who attack or are
aggressive towards others do not have low self-esteem. Many have very high selfesteem.
Acts that result from road rage are often triggered by beliefs that the other
person has been rude to or demonstrated that he or she believes that the aggressor is
unimportant. Students in a doctorate program have envisioned themselves as obtaining
that Ph.D. and having students and others acknowledge their importance by calling them
"Dr." or "Professor." If they perceive that you are taking or have taken that opportunity
away from them, some will become very depressed and some will become very angry
and plan revenge.
If the person appears in your office and has a gun, before he/she has a chance to threaten
you, try to communicate that you like the person and are glad to see him/her! It is
recommended that you do something such as walk immediately towards the person with
your hand out to shake their hand and say, "I'm glad to see you." If he/she refuses to
shake your hand, continue to act positive. Try not to act afraid.
2. Be empathetic. If he/she is there with a gun, he/she is angry. Before he/she has a chance
to tell you that he/she is angry with you, tell him/her that you think he/she should be
angry at.receiving a failing grade, receiving a letter dropping him/her from the program,
or whatever. "You have studied very hard," or "You have worked on that paper for a
long time," or "You have worked in the program for a long time." "You must be
frustrated." DO NOT ARGUE WITH THE PERSON. Tell him/her that you can
understand why he/she is mad. Be loud and firm about it. You are with him/her and not
against him/her.
3. Try to change his/her viewpoint from the past and present to the future. He/she has been
thinking about what had been done to him/her. Try to get him/her to think about the
future. "Let's plan what we can do next." "Let's talk about what other programs you can
get into." "A person with your ability and experience can do better in a good program."
"You have a number of alternatives." Don't threaten him/her with jail or remind him/her
of the consequences if he/she shoots, because that is too much like a dare and makes you
oppositional.
4. Try to move him/her to a public place. In public the person is aware of others around and
is less likely to feel safe about shooting you. "Let's go talk about what we can do over a
coke or cup of coffee."
In cases where there is no weapon involved, you might suggest that the person deserves help.
Suggest that you walk over to the counseling center in the Health Center together. Stay until the
individual is able to see a professional, psychologist, psychiatrist, or counselor. You might also
suggest that free counseling is available and dial the counseling center for the person. Tell the
receptionist that this person wants to make an appointment. (If you suggest that the person needs
to make an appointment, he/she will probably never call, even if you write the telephone number
down).
Guidelines to decrease the probability of a person coming to your office or home with a gun:
1. Be positive and friendly with students. The more that students see you as a
faculty/staff member who is on their side, the less they want to harm you.
2. Be empathetic. Students respect faculty/staff who are tough, provided that they are
perceived as fair. When you fail a student, tell him or her that you are sympathetic
and understand that they tried. Tell them that you believe that they would have done
better if they had had more time to study. (Give them back their self-esteem.)
3. Be prepared for anger. If the department is destroying the student's hopes, how
should the student receive the message? Should our model be how we try to
communicate the death of a person to their loved ones? Should our bad news be by
mail? From a personal meeting with the committee? Or from a meeting with you
when you present other options to the person about their career?
All members of the University community must cooperate to maintain a safe work environment.
Each unit is responsible for investigating reports of violent or threatening behavior and taking
appropriate action. Individuals should report to their supervisor any incidents of violent,
threatening, harassing, or intimidating behavior in the workplace, whether or not those involved
are University employees.
Supervisors and managers who receive reports of violent or threatening behavior must notify the
head of the unit and Human Resources. Human Resources will assist supervisors and managers
in their response to allegations of violent or threatening conduct.
Violent behavior must be reported on an "Incident/Accident/Quality Improvement Report" form.
The form is attached to this policy. After completion the form should be submitted to Human
Resources for proper action.
In addition, allegations of violent conduct on the part of students or student workers must be
reported to the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and allegations of violent
conduct on the part of faculty must be reported to the Provost's Office.
Employees sufficiently uncomfortable with a current or potential situation should call the
University Police department to provide a presence during that situation.
For physical assault or direct threats of harm to people or property, call either 911 or 9-911
(either works) from campus phones, or 911 from non-campus phones.
July 1, 2001

Friday, May 07, 2010 11:14 AM

3.12 Weapons

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 224.0)

You may not possess, use, or store weapons on the University campus, or in areas controlled by the University, including vehicles, University apartments, residence halls, or sorority or fraternity houses. Weapons covered by this policy include, but are not limited to: firearms, firearm ammunition, air pistols, air rifles, fireworks, incendiary devices, lock blade or fixed blade knives with a blade length of four inches or greater, blackjacks, metal knuckles, or any other such offensive weapons of any description. You may possess tear gas-type products in personal use quantities for self-defense, but you may not use them for purposes other than self-defense.

Violation of this policy may be punishable by disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:12 PM

3.13 Campus Notification about Registered Sex Offenders and Residential Restrictions for Registered Sex Offenders

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 219.2; Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, 42 U.S.C. § 1407(j) and 20 U.S.C. §1092 (f)(1)(I); Arkansas Code Ann. §12-12-913(b) et seq.; Arkansas Code Ann. § 5-14-128; Board Policy 525.1)

In compliance with federal and state legislation, the University of Arkansas Police Department (UAPD) will provide timely and appropriate notification to the campus community about the presence of registered sex offenders enrolled in, attending, or employed by the University. In consultation with the Campus Notification Committee, UAPD will prepare and carry out a notification plan that is appropriate for each individual sex offender. A written summary of campus guidelines and the notification plan for each offender will be maintained by UAPD. Determinations about notifications will be made by UAPD in consultation with the Campus Notification Committee and other appropriate campus officials, law enforcement officials, or treatment specialists on a case-by-case basis, and guided by the offender's risk assessment level in accordance with guidelines established by the Arkansas Sex Offenders Assessment Committee.

Arkansas Act 330 of 2003 makes it unlawful for a Level 3 or Level 4 registered sex offender to reside within 2,000 feet of property on which any public or private elementary or secondary school or daycare facility is located. Because all University-operated residential facilities on campus and all fraternities and sororities fall within this restriction, no Level 3 or Level 4 registered sex offenders may live on campus.  The University reserves the right to exclude from University-affiliated housing, or to modify the housing assignment for, any other student who is required to register as a sex offender.

Friday, May 07, 2010 11:16 AM

3.14 Health and Safety

The University's efforts to maintain a safe and healthy campus environment involve the efforts of a number of departments and units, including:

  • The Physical Plant for maintenance of buildings and grounds;
     
  • Environmental Health and Safety for safety training, safety assistance, and compliance with safety laws and regulations;
     
  • The University Health Center for emergency medical treatment, preventative health care, and health awareness programs;
     
  • The Department of Public Safety (University Police) for response to automobile accidents, serious injuries and medical emergencies, violent assaults, crime response and prevention, crowd control for University sponsored events, escort services, and property protection; and
     
  • Risk Management and Insurance for work-related injuries or illnesses that may involve a Workers' Compensation claim.

If you become aware of any injuries, potentially unsafe or hazardous conditions, or criminal activities, please report them immediately to the appropriate department or unit or to your supervisor.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:10 PM

3.15 Employment of Relatives (Nepotism)

(Board Policy 410.1; Governor's Policy Directive #8.)

Employment of relatives in the same department or division of the University is allowed only when one will not supervise or have control over personnel decisions affecting the other. To avoid possible conflict of interest, relatives must not participate, either formally or informally, in decisions to hire, retain, promote, or determine the salaries of each other.

3.15 Updated 2/20/2010

Friday, April 30, 2010 11:59 AM

3.16 Employment of Constitutional Officers and Spouses

(Act 34 of 1999)

If you are elected to a constitutional office (including Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Treasurer of State, Attorney General, Commissioner of State Lands, Auditor of State, member of the Arkansas House of Representatives, or member of the Arkansas Senate) you may not be hired by any state agency after you are elected and during the term for which you were elected, unless you resign the constitutional office prior to being hired.

If you were employed by a state agency prior to being elected to a constitutional office, you may continue your employment. However, your position cannot be reclassified, unless it is a general reclassification affecting all positions in your class and grade equally. You cannot receive any pay increases other than cost of living increases authorized by the General Assembly without the prior approval of the Joint Budget Committee (or the Legislative Council if the General Assembly is not in session) and the Governor.

If your spouse is elected to a constitutional office, you may not be hired by a state agency after your spouse is elected and during your spouse's term of office without the prior approval of the Joint Budget Committee (or the Legislative Council if the General Assembly is not in session) and the Governor.

If you were employed by a state agency prior to your spouse's being elected to a constitutional office, or if you are hired by a state agency during your spouse's term of office, you are subject to the following restrictions: (a) Your position cannot be reclassified, unless it is a general reclassification affecting all positions in your class and grade equally. (b) While your spouse serves as a constitutional officer and for two years after your spouse leaves office, you cannot be promoted or transferred without the prior approval of the Joint Budget Committee or the Legislative Council and the Governor. (c) You cannot receive any pay increases in excess of 15% without the prior approval of the Joint Budget Committee (or the Legislative Council if the general Assembly is not in session) and the Governor.

Former members of the General Assembly and their spouses cannot be employed by a state agency within 24 months after the legislator leaves office in any job which (a) was newly created by legislative action within 24 months prior to the legislator leaving; or (b) had a maximum salary increase of more than 15% authorized by legislative action within 24 months prior to the legislator leaving office.

3.16 Updated 2/20/2010

Friday, April 30, 2010 10:52 AM

3.17 Conflicts of Interest and Commitment

(Board Policy 330.1, Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 404.0)

Preamble

University employees need to be sensitive to the possibility that outside obligations, financial interests, or employment may affect their responsibilities and decisions as members of the University community. Involvement of University employees in outside activities, both public and private, often serves the interests of the individual, University, and general public. Participation of individuals in activities outside the University is encouraged to the extent that they do not interfere with the mission of the University in preserving, generating, and disseminating knowledge.

University employees may be faced with situations that conflict with their obligations, responsibilities, and decisions related to the mission of the University. These conflicts can generally be categorized as conflicts of interest and conflicts of commitment. Conflicts of interest are situations in which University employees may have the opportunity to influence University administrative, business, or academic decisions in ways that could lead to personal gain, give improper advantage to self or others, or interfere with the preservation, generation, or public dissemination of knowledge. Conflicts of commitment are situations in which University employees' time and effort given to outside activities and interests interfere with their obligations and responsibilities to the University.

Conflicts of interest and commitment are not necessarily unwarranted, unethical, or illegal. Furthermore, conflicts of interest and commitment are not always avoidable. The failure to disclose situations that have the potential for or involve actual conflicts of interest or commitment, however, may be unethical and/or illegal.

Disclosure and Remediation

Situations that have the appearance of, potential for, or involve actual conflicts of interest or commitment must be reported in writing to the employee's appropriate supervisor (i.e., department chair, dean, director, vice chancellor). Written disclosure should be made by the individual before any agreements are completed between the employee, University, and any outside organizations. Modifications to existing agreements should be reported as they occur. In addition, continuing agreements should be reported on an annual basis. In disclosing these situations, the employee should indicate any steps that can or will be taken to avoid or minimize any conflicts.

After consulting with the employee, considering whether an actual or potential conflict of interest or commitment exists, and the ramifications for the University, the supervisor will provide the employee with a written interpretation and any proposed remedial actions within five additional working days. The supervisor will provide a copy of the document to his or her superior for approval within five additional working days and retention. Employees may appeal the interpretation, decision, or proposed remediation to the Chancellor or the Chancellor's designee. The supervisor or superior shall refer serious conflicts to the Chancellor or designated official. The Chancellor or designee will immediately appoint an ad hoc committee of at least five members, along with appropriate ex officio members, to review the situation and make recommendations within twenty working days.

The decision of the Chancellor or official designee will be final. (A form for disclosure of potential conflicts of interest and commitment may be found on the web site at: http://vcfa.uark.edu/Documents/4040FormA.pdf or obtained from the offices of deans, directors, or department heads.)

Guidelines

The following list provides some examples of the type of situations that may involve conflicts of interest or commitment and, hence, should be disclosed. Because a particular situation appears on the list does not necessarily mean that a conflict of interest or commitment exists. Even if a conflict exists, the situation may be unavoidable or in the University's best interest and, hence, allowed to continue.

The list of situations is not exhaustive. Other situations or activities may exist that have the appearance of, potential for, or involve actual conflicts. Situations, whether listed below or not, that have the appearance of, potential for, or involve actual conflicts of interest or commitment should be disclosed.

  1. Employee or immediate family member ownership, management, or other business ties with a private or public organization that has dealings with the University.
  2. Participation in outside business activities.
  3. Teaching credit or noncredit courses, seminars, or workshops not for the University.
  4. Requiring material for use by students for which the instructor derives direct or indirect financial benefit.
  5. Fees provided for professional service including consulting, honoraria, royalties, or expert testimony.
  6. Continuing role in the scientific and technical efforts of a commercial enterprise.
  7. Personal payments, income, gifts, or other benefits received or promised from an organization proposing or sponsoring research.
  8. Private remuneration for University research provided by an individual or organization.
  9. Revenues from patents or licensed technology.
  10. Service or financial interest in an entity that provides research grants or contracts.
  11. Direct commercial or financial interests of immediate family members in employee's research.
  12. Transfer of technology to an organization in which the employee or immediate family members have an interest.
  13. Time and effort in extramural activities that interfere with obligations, duties, and responsibilities to the University.
  14. Employee or immediate family member having a financial interest in University decisions.
  15. Use of University facilities, employees, or students in personal or commercial activities.
  16. Use of official University position for personal/family gains/interests.
  17. Appointment, promotion, supervision, or management of an immediate family member. (See Section 3.12)
  18. Acceptance of gifts or gratuities offered because of University position.
  19. Use of University credit, purchasing power, or facilities for non-University activities.
  20. Advertising endorsements based upon University position.
  21. Outside activities influencing decisions or behavior with respect to preservation, generation, and dissemination of knowledge (e.g., delaying dissemination of research information, diverting to external organizations research opportunities that the University would have a normal expectation to obtain).

Related Board Policies include: Service on Boards of Financial Institutions (215.1), Contracting Authority (300.1), Nepotism (410.1), Outside Employment of Faculty and Staff Members for Compensation (450.1), Political Activity (465.1), and Use of University Facilities (705.1).

Grants and contracts that may involve a potential conflict of interest are subject to review and approval procedures. Board Policy provides that the University shall not, without approval of the Chancellor or Vice President for Agriculture, enter into a contract with a current or former state employee, member of the Arkansas General Assembly, state constitutional officer, or board or commission member, or the immediate family member of any of those persons, or any entity in which any of those persons holds ownership interest of ten percent or greater.

Monday, September 28, 2009 4:07 PM

3.18 Outside Employment

(Board Policy 450.1; Arkansas Code Ann. §21-8-203; Governor's Policy Directive #1)

Arkansas law states that "...all state employees who are employed on a regular salary basis shall be required to disclose each source of income in excess of five hundred dollars ($500) earned during any calendar year from sources other than their regular salary from employment or from professional or consultant service rendered for any public agency."

If you are a classified staff member or a non-classified staff member who is not an administrator, you may have outside employment if the following conditions are met:

The employment does not constitute a conflict of interest (see Section 3.17, above) and does not interfere with the performance of your University job. If you have questions about whether an outside job would constitute a conflict of interest, check with your supervisor.

The work is completed off the premises of the University.

The work is completed during non-University work time.

The work does not involve the use of materials, supplies, equipment, etc. belonging to the University.
You must submit a completed copy of the Disclosure of Potential Conflict of Interest and Commitment form for review to your supervisor, who will submit it to his or her immediate supervisor for review. A copy of the form, with an approval or outlining steps to manage the potential conflict, will be returned to you and the original will be kept by your supervisor.

The University's policy concerning outside employment for non-classified staff, administrators, and faculty is as follows:

While emphasizing the fact that full-time faculty and non-classified administrative staff members of the University are obligated to devote their working time and efforts primarily to University activities, the University recognizes that a limited amount of outside work for private compensation may be advantageous to all concerned. Deans, department heads, directors, vice chancellors, chancellors, vice presidents, and the president are included as administrative staff. Such persons are therefore encouraged to engage in outside employment which will affirmatively contribute to their professional advancement or correlate usefully with their University work. This employment shall not interfere in any substantial way with the employee's University duties nor conflict with his/her University assignments. Written approval from the department head and/or dean shall be obtained in advance of such outside employment. Each dean or similar officer shall keep records on outside employment by personnel in his/her college or administrative unit. The report should include actual time spent during the reporting period. Such records shall be reviewed by the appropriate vice chancellor and submitted to the Chancellor by August 1 of each year and such records shall be reviewed periodically by the vice chancellor. The employee shall always make it clear that the outside employment is his/her own responsibility and that in it he/she does not act as an agent or representative of the University. University facilities or property shall not be used except with the permission of the department head or dean, and the payment of appropriate fees may be required.

3.18 Updated 2/20/2010

Monday, September 19, 2011 1:11 PM

3.19 Employment by Two University Departments or Two State Agencies or Institutions

(Arkansas Code Ann. § 19-4-1604 and Arkansas Code Ann. § 6-63-307 )

Under certain circumstances and with prior approval, University employees may work for two University departments or two state agencies or institutions concurrently. The work performed for the second department, agency or institution must not interfere with the proper and required performance of the employee's duties in the primary position. The combined salary payments must not exceed the maximum allowable salary for the higher paid position, except that, under Arkansas Code Ann. § 19-4-1604, state employees may teach temporarily at state-supported institutions of higher education even though their combined salaries will exceed the line item maximum. This exception is subject to the approval of the Chief Fiscal Officer of the State. University of Arkansas Human Resources can provide information about the approval process for concurrent employment.

You may not be on paid sick leave from one state agency or institution while you are being paid by another state agency or institution.

 

Thursday, July 26, 2012 2:20 PM

3.20 Job Sharing

(Act 1461 0f 2001, Arkansas Code Ann. §21-5-203, as amended)

Arkansas law allows job sharing, a form of employment in which two people arrange their work hours in a way that covers a single, regular, full-time salaried position. The combined number of hours worked by the two part-time employees cannot exceed the number of hours a full-time employee would work in the same position (usually 40 hours per week.) Both employees must be part-time and both must use the position in the same way. For example, if the position is classified as a secretary, both employees must perform secretarial duties. Hourly positions may also be shared.

3.20 Updated 2/20/2010

Friday, April 30, 2010 10:37 AM

4. Employment Policies and Procedures

4.1 Application Procedures

University of Arkansas vacancies or positions are posted on the University website at http://hr.uark.edu.

When applying for all University classified positions and Division of Agriculture positions, both classified and non-classified, applicants will be directed to https://jobs.uark.edu to complete an online application.  The application may be completed in the Human Resources office or from any computer with internet access.  The applicant will need to complete the application and apply for the positions in which they are interested.  If the hiring department is requesting a resume, cover letter, letter of recommendation, or other document relative to the position, the applicant will be required to upload the document(s) at the time of application.

If an applicant applying for a classified position meets the state minimum and/or the departmental preferred qualifications for the position, the application will be sent to the department where the vacancy exists.  The status on the 'Application Status' page will indicate if the applicant does not meet the minimum and/or preferred qualifications.  The hiring department will be responsible for scheduling an interview, checking references, and following hiring procedures.   

Application procedures for non-classified positions that are not within the Division of Agriculture are explained in the individual position announcements. There is no standard University application form for these positions, and application is made directly to the department in which the vacancy exists. Information about where to send application materials and required documents is usually contained in the position announcement. Human Resources does not receive applications for non-classified positions, but does have information about currently open positions.

If you are currently a University employee, you may apply for any vacant position by following the procedures outlined above. See also Section 4.5, Promotions.

4.1 Updated 2/19/10

Friday, April 30, 2010 10:11 AM

4.2 Recruitment and Selection

All regular, benefited University positions must be listed with University of Arkansas Human Resources if they are classified and listed with the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance if they are non-classified. Human Resources places general advertisements for classified University positions in local job-listing publications, and lists current vacancies on the Human Resources website, and on the printed listing described above, but departments may also run advertisements approved by Human Resources for specific classified positions or groups of positions. All non-classified positions must be advertised in the appropriate recruitment sources, in accordance with the University's affirmative action plan. Current employees are encouraged to inquire about promotion and transfer opportunities through Human Resources.

Selection for positions is carried out by the departments in which the vacancies exist and is made on the basis of job-related qualifications and experience and in a manner consistent with the University's Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity policies described in Section 3.5 of this handbook.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 8:47 AM

4.3 Performance Reviews

4.3 Performance Reviews
(Arkansas Code Ann. §21-5-1001-1003; Acts 100 and 101 of 1985; Act 899 of 1997; Act 22 of 2003; Act 449 of 2007)

Performance evaluation is a process that should take place continuously. While day-to-day evaluation is usually informal, Arkansas law requires that the performance of all classified employees be evaluated formally at least once a year, in accordance with the Arkansas Performance Evaluation Plan.

Non-classified staff must be evaluated annually by their immediate supervisors, using forms and procedures appropriate to their positions and responsibilities. Supervisors must discuss non-classified evaluations with the employees being evaluated and give them copies of their evaluations.

The performance evaluation is the basis for any salary increase. Employees who receive a written performance-based or disciplinary reprimand during the twelve-month rating period covered by their evaluation are not eligible for a merit increase.

The Arkansas Performance Evaluation Plan

The Arkansas Performance Evaluation Plan is a standards-based system. Performance standards describe how a job is to be performed and are developed to represent fully satisfactory job performance. Your supervisor may ask for your assistance in developing your job standards, and should review your standards with you at least annually, in addition to revising them each time your job duties change. Your supervisor is responsible for establishing and up-dating your performance standards and has the authority to determine the standards for your job.

The Office of Personnel Management has established guidelines for the administration of the Arkansas Performance Evaluation Plan. The University provides additional guidelines. The guidelines include the following requirements:


1. Annual evaluations must be completed at least 30 days prior to a classified employee's merit eligibility date, using the approved performance evaluation form (electronic). Classified employees appointed October 1, 2006, or earlier have an October 1 merit eligibility date. Classified employees appointed after October 1, 2006, have a merit eligibility date one year after their appointment date. If interim evaluations are done, the interim evaluations must be considered in the annual evaluation.

2. Standards for the rating period must be set by the supervisor, and where possible with the input of the employee, at the beginning of each rating cycle or not later than 30 days after the start of new duties.

3. The standards must be developed from a list of critical job tasks and stated in terms of observable behavior.

4. The standards must be communicated clearly to and understood by the employee.

5. The completed standards must be reviewed by a higher reviewing official in the chain of command to the rating supervisor.

6. An electronic copy of the standards must be given to the employee.

7. If a rating supervisor is transferred to another unit or terminates employment, he or she must complete performance evaluations for those employees whose most recent evaluation was completed more than 90 calendar days prior to the supervisor's termination date.

8. If, at any time during the evaluation period, the supervisor determines that an employee's performance has fallen below an acceptable standard, the supervisor must document the below-acceptable performance and counsel the employee.

9. If an employee's general performance falls below the acceptable standard, the employee must be placed on probation and counseled.

10. The completed performance evaluation must be reviewed and approved by a higher reviewing official in the chain of command to the rating supervisor.

11. Employees must be allowed to make a formal request for reconsideration of their performance evaluation. (See the Appeals Procedure section, below.)

Your Performance Rating

Your formal performance evaluation will be made on the basis of your performance over the preceding twelve months. Your supervisor will compile the observations of your performance during that period and will rate your actual performance in comparison to the expected performance standards. The rating uses four performance categories: unsatisfactory, satisfactory, above average, and exceeds standards. Your supervisor will review and explain your ratings in a performance evaluation conference. You may use the conference as a time to discuss your performance achievements as well as problems you may have encountered during the rating period. Be prepared to make suggestions about ways you might correct or improve your performance.
At the end of the performance evaluation conference, your supervisor will ask you to make written comments about your evaluation in the place provided on the electronic evaluation form. You may use this opportunity to state your agreement or disagreement with the evaluation and the reasons for your response. You will then be asked to sign the form. Your signature does not mean that you accept or agree with the rating, only that your supervisor has discussed it with you.

Establishing New Performance Standards

Your performance evaluation marks the end of a rating cycle. Within a few days, you can expect your supervisor to either reaffirm or rewrite your performance standards for the next rating period, which will begin a new performance evaluation cycle. Your supervisor may ask for your assistance in establishing your standards. To prepare for that process, you may wish to take the following steps:


1. Think through what you are supposed to do in your job. Refer to the position description. List the tasks that are important to your position. List only those tasks that you are currently required to do, not those that you may have done in the past.

2. Discuss your list of tasks with your supervisor and compare it with the list your supervisor may have compiled. Discuss the job. This is also a good time to discuss problems you encounter frequently and to make suggestions about how those problems might be solved.

3. Once you and your supervisor have developed your performance standards, they will be reviewed by a higher reviewing official in the chain of command to your supervisor. Keep your standards in mind during the year and make notes about any performance problems and accomplishments Your notes can be used at your next performance evaluation conference to help you and your supervisor discuss your performance during that rating period.

Appeals Procedure

If you disagree with your supervisor's evaluation of your performance and have evidence to support your reasons, you may appeal your performance rating, in accordance with the following procedures:

1. Ask your supervisor to reconsider your evaluation. Your request for reconsideration must be made in writing within ten calendar days of the evaluation interview, and must state the reasons you think the rating is inaccurate, providing evidence or documentation, as appropriate.

2. Your supervisor will review your reasons for disagreeing with your rating and respond to you in writing within ten calendar days of receiving your request.

3. If you and your supervisor cannot reach agreement, you may submit a written request for review, within five calendar days, to your supervisor's immediate supervisor.

4. That official will review your request for reconsideration and your supervisor's response, and may ask either or both of you to provide additional documentation or explanation. Within ten calendar days of receiving your request for review, your supervisor's immediate supervisor will respond to you and your supervisor in writing, proposing a resolution of the disagreement.

5. If the unit in which you work has additional levels of supervision, and you are not satisfied with the proposed resolution, you may appeal the decision of your supervisor's supervisor to the next level and beyond, provided that you present evidence or documentation supporting your request for review, up to the level of the head of your unit. At each level, you must submit your request for review within five calendar days after receiving a response and the reviewer will have ten calendar days to respond.

6. If you disagree with the recommendations of the head of your unit, you may submit a written request for review, presenting supporting evidence, within five calendar days, to your vice chancellor. The vice chancellor will review the written record and may ask for specific additional information or documentation. Within ten calendar days of receiving your request for review, your vice chancellor will recommend a resolution, in writing, to you and your supervisor.

7. If you are not satisfied with the recommendation of your vice chancellor, you may submit a request for review, along with documentation, to Human Resources, which will forward it, within five calendar days, to the chair of the Performance Evaluation Review Committee. The Performance Evaluation Review Committee will meet within ten calendar days to review all pertinent documentation concerning your disagreement with your supervisor's performance rating, and, within ten calendar days of its meeting, will make a recommendation in writing to the Chancellor. The decision of the Chancellor is final and binding.

Note: When the procedures specify time periods, such as ten calendar days, within which a step in the procedures must take place, official University holidays do not count in calculating those time periods. If you need assistance with any of the written parts of the appeals process, Human Resources can help you.

Performance-Based Probation

If, at any time during the evaluation period, your supervisor determines that your performance has, in general, fallen below the standards for your position (so that your overall performance is unsatisfactory), you may be placed on probation. Your supervisor must document the below-acceptable performance, inform you that you have been placed on probation, and counsel you about ways you can improve. The length of your probation for unacceptable performance is to be not less than 30 nor more than 60 days. During the probationary period, your supervisor will counsel you about your progress or lack of progress.


At the end of the probationary period, your supervisor will conduct a formal evaluation. If you have met the standards of performance (completely satisfactory), your supervisor will remove you from probationary status. If you fail to meet the standards for your position, your supervisor may extend the probationary period and give you additional counseling or may terminate your employment. If your performance drops below satisfactory during an evaluation year and you improve before the time of your annual evaluation, the unsatisfactory evaluation will not go into your employee file. If your annual evaluation score is unsatisfactory, that evaluation will become part of your permanent file.

 

 Benefits of Performance Evaluation

The performance evaluation plan is designed to help you understand what is expected of you in your job, give you information about what you need to do to improve your performance, determine your eligibility for salary increases, and help develop your career opportunities. You will begin each evaluation cycle with a copy of your performance standards. The standards should tell you exactly what you have to do and how well you must do it to receive a fully satisfactory performance rating. This advance notice will help you, throughout the rating period, to meet your supervisor's expectations.

You and your supervisor should talk with each other, throughout the rating period, about your performance, so there will be no surprises in the evaluation conference. The communication process that performance evaluation requires provides an opportunity for you and your supervisor to work out misunderstandings and disagreements as they occur and before they become more serious. The review of your standards and of your evaluation by a higher reviewing official in the chain of command to the rating supervisor will help to ensure that your performance is being rated fairly and objectively and that your performance standards are comparable to those for other employees in your unit.

 

 

 

Friday, June 03, 2011 1:59 PM

4.4 Promotions

If you are a classified staff employee, there are three methods by which you may be promoted:

1. You may be promoted, by your department head, to another position in your department or unit which is classified at a higher grade, if you meet the state minimum qualifications for that position. This is called an internal promotion. The position that is left vacant by your promotion will be advertised, except when it has been filled internally, left vacant by the department, or eliminated.

2. You may apply for a position in another area of the University which is classified at a higher grade or for a non-classified position. If you meet the state minimum qualifications and are selected for the position, your transfer to that position will also be a promotion for you.

Your new rate of pay will be at least entry for your new grade, and cannot exceed Career Service of your new grade. If your new classification is higher than your previous one, your pay will increase by 10%. If your promotion results from the reclassification of your current job or a class upgrade, your increase will be 10% or entry of the new classification, whichever is higher. If your new job is non-classified, your pay will be determined by the department's budget, pay rates for similar positions, and your own experience, skills, and education, within the constraints of the legislative line item maximum pay for that position. See also Section 6.3

 

Friday, August 19, 2011 10:03 AM

4.5 Demotions

If you are a classified staff member, there are three methods by which you can be demoted:
1. You may be demoted, by your department head, to another position in your department or unit which is classified at a lower grade. This is called an internal demotion. The position that is left vacant by your demotion will be advertised, except when it has been filled internally, left vacant by the department, or eliminated.

2. Your position may be reclassified if your responsibilities have changed significantly. If the new reclassification is at a lower grade, the reclassification of your position will mean a demotion for you.

3. You may apply for a position in another area of the University which is classified at a lower grade. If you are selected for the position, your transfer to that position will also be a demotion for you.
Your new rate of pay cannot exceed the Career Service level of your new grade. If your new classification is lower than your previous one, your pay will decrease by 10%. However, if your demotion results from the reclassification of your current job or a legislative class downgrade, your pay will not be affected. If you are demoted because your original position has been eliminated, you may continue to receive the same rate of pay.

Friday, April 30, 2010 12:27 PM

4.6 Transfers and Lateral Changes

If you are a classified employee, you may transfer to another position classified at the same grade in your department or unit, or to a position classified at the same grade in another department or unit; this would be a lateral change. You may also transfer to another state agency or institution. If you transfer to another agency or institution without a break in service or within two pay periods, you will be considered to have transferred and will retain certain benefits. See also Section 6.3.

Note that, under OPM definitions, two pay periods consist of twenty consecutive working days for state agencies and institutions of higher education.

  1. If you transfer to another position classified at the same grade, in your department or unit, in another department or unit of the University, or in another state agency or institution, your pay will remain the same.
     
  2. If you transfer to a position at a higher or lower grade in another state agency or institution, the effect on your pay will be the same as if you had been promoted or demoted.
     
  3. If you transfer from a non-classified position to a classified position, your new pay will be at a rate within the new classification which does not exceed your previous pay rate or the maximum authorized for the new position. If your previous pay rate was below Level I for the classified position, your classified pay rate will be at Level I. If you transfer to a non-classified position, your pay will be determined by the department's budget, pay rates for similar positions, and your own experience, skills, and education, within the constraints of the legislative line item maximum pay for that position.
     
  4. If you have left your previous position and transfer to a new one within two pay periods (twenty consecutive working days), you will have all of your unused sick leave reinstated. If you have received a lump sum payment for unused vacation days upon leaving your previous position, you must either wait until the number of days you were paid for have elapsed before beginning your new position or reimburse the agency or institution which awarded you the lump sum vacation pay for any time which has not elapsed since you left your previous position. If you reimburse the agency, your annual leave time will be reinstated.

Friday, April 30, 2010 12:30 PM

4.7 Rehires

(AHRMS Policy Manual 220-4, 5)

If you leave the University and are rehired by any department in the University or by another state agency or institution after two pay periods (twenty consecutive working days), you will be considered a rehire. If you have left another state agency or institution and are hired by the University after two pay periods (twenty consecutive working days) you will also be considered a rehire.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 4:06 PM

4.8 Work References

(Act 1474 of 1999; AHRMS Policy Manual, 180)

With your written permission, a prospective employer who requests it may be given the following information about you as a current or former employee: (a) date and duration of your employment; (b) your current pay rate and wage history; (c) your job description and duties; (e) attendance information; (f) the results of drug or alcohol tests administered within one year of the request; (g) threats of violence, harassing acts, or threatening behavior related to your workplace or directed at another employee; (h) whether you were voluntarily or involuntarily separated from employment and the reasons for the separation; and (i) whether you are eligible for rehire.

You must sign and date the consent form and it will be valid only for the length of time that you are considered an active applicant by the prospective employer, but for no longer than six months.

The University or any other state agency which discloses this information about you will be presumed, under Act 1474 of 1999, to be acting in good faith and will be immune from civil liability unless it can be shown that the information disclosed was false and that the University or other state agency had knowledge of its falsity or acted with malice or reckless disregard for the truth.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 4:06 PM

5. Scheduling Policies

5.1 Work Hours

(AHRMS Policy Manual 200-1.3; Governor's Policy Directive #5)

A governor's policy directive requires all state offices to be open for business between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. However, department administrators may establish other working hours, so long as all full-time employees work a forty-hour work week. At the University, work hours for most full-time employees are from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with one-half hour for lunch. Some departments require different work schedules. Most University offices are kept open until 5:00 and do not close for lunch, so flexing of schedules may be required. Your department head or supervisor will inform you about normal work hours for your department and for your individual position.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:48 PM

5.2 Flex-Time

You and your supervisor may agree to a work week with a time schedule that differs from the regular daily schedule if it serves both your needs and those of the University. The schedule must not create a pattern of overtime work or cause undue hardship for your work unit. Any flex-time agreements that you make must be put in writing and be signed by you and your supervisor.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:47 PM

5.3 Overtime

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 403.1; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 440.8; Federal Fair Labor Standards Act - Public Law 99-150 of 1986; Arkansas Code Ann. §19-4-1612; AHRMS Policy Manual 110)

Only non-exempt employees receive credit for overtime work. (See Section 2.4, Exempt and Non-Exempt Employees, for definitions.) If you are a non-exempt employee and you work more than 40 hours in any work week, you will accrue compensatory time at a rate of one and one-half hours for every hour of work performed in excess of 40 hours.

If you are non-exempt, and therefore eligible for overtime, you should never work more than 40 hours in any work week without the prior approval of your department head. An overtime request form can be found on the Human Resources web site.

Overtime is referred to in the BASIS leave accounting system as extra time. Your department leave representative will record any hours in excess of 40 you work in each work week as extra time, and you will be credited with one and one-half hours of compensatory time for every hour over 40 that you actually work. (Annual leave time and sick leave time are not time you actually work, and University holidays are usually not time you actually work.) Extra time must be approved by the person authorized to do so for your department, usually the department head. You may use any accrued compensatory hours as leave, at a time when it is convenient for your department. You may use compensatory time, until the balance is depleted, before using annual leave. You may also use your compensatory time in lieu of sick leave. Compensatory time must be earned before it can be used.

If it creates a hardship for your department to give you compensatory time off, your department head may approve monetary compensation for the overtime which you have worked. You will be paid at one and one-half times your regular rate of pay for each hour over 40 which you have worked in any work week. Overtime pay is generally discouraged. Arkansas law states: "It is hereby declared to be the policy of the State of Arkansas that overtime pay for state employees is the least desirable method of compensation for overtime work." When overtime is unavoidable, it is to be managed in the most efficient and economic manner possible. Your department may require you to use any accumulated compensatory time, at its convenience, to avoid cash payments. If you transfer to another department within the University or change from a non-exempt to an exempt position, you must either use or be paid for all of your accrued compensatory time before the change in position occurs.

The rules and regulations set out by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act apply to overtime. They include the definitions of exempt and non-exempt employees, the requirements for compensatory time or pay, and other related requirements. The Fair Labor Standards Act limits the amount of compensatory time most employees can accrue to 240 hours. Employees who work at least some of the time in a public safety activity, such as fire protection or law enforcement, in an emergency response activity, or in a seasonal activity, such as farm work, may accumulate up to 480 hours of compensatory time. Any overtime accrued beyond these limits must be compensated with overtime pay, at a rate of one and one-half times the regular rate.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:46 PM

5.4 Absence from Work

If you must be absent from work for any reason, you are responsible for notifying your department within the first hour of your regularly-scheduled time for reporting to work. Your department has the option of requiring earlier notification. If you do not notify your department that you will be absent, or have someone notify the department for you if you are not able to, your absence will be considered unauthorized and may result in disciplinary action.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:45 PM

5.5 Inclement Weather

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 210.0, 211.0; Governor's Policy Directive #7; Act 835 of 2003)

In the event of inclement weather, the University recognizes the need to address how such conditions may affect the overall operations of the institution. In general, the University must continue certain operations during periods of inclement weather due to the needs of students, the requirements of ongoing research activities, and other factors. Although the University generally expects all employees to make every reasonable effort to come to work on occasions when the University is open during inclement weather, this general expectation is subject to each employee's exercise of his or her personal judgment and common sense regarding his or her personal safety under the circumstances and weather conditions. Employees who do not report to work because of inclement weather conditions will be charged annual leave. This will be considered an excused absence. You are responsible for notifying your supervisor if you do not come to work because of weather. With the approval of the supervisor, an employee may elect to use leave without pay in lieu of annual leave. Extra-help hourly employees who miss work due to inclement weather will not be paid for time missed, unless the inclement weather has affected the operating status of the University for the time they are scheduled to work. 

In general, inclement weather may affect the operating status of the University in three possible ways: Delayed Opening, Early Dismissal, and Closure. Employees whose departments have designated their responsibilities as "weather or event essential" are expected to report to work as regularly scheduled, regardless of University operating status, unless advised otherwise by their supervisor.

In the event of a delayed opening, employees who arrive at work by the designated opening time will receive inclement weather leave with pay (IP) and will not be charged for late arrival. Employees arriving after the designated time will be charged the full amount of time that they are late. Employees who do not come to work will be charged a full day's absence.  In the event of an early dismissal, employees will be dismissed to go home and will receive inclement weather leave with pay (IP) for the balance of the employee's work day. Employees who leave earlier than the designated dismissal time will be charged leave for the full amount of time they are absent prior to the dismissal time and employees who do not come to work will be charged a full day's absence.

Employees who received prior approval to be absent from work on a day that becomes designated as an inclement weather day will not receive inclement weather leave with pay (IP). The absence should be charged to annual or sick leave as appropriate.

In the event of a closure, all offices and regular business operations will be closed. Employees should not report to work.

The Chancellor, or his designee, will instruct the Office of University Relations to post appropriate inclement weather information to the University's web site - http://www.uark.edu/ - via the RazALERT emergency communications system - http://emergency.uark.edu/ - and through notification of local and regional media.

Please refer to the following policies for more information:

Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 210.0, Inclement Weather Policy

Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 211.0, Weather Emergency Procedures

Academic Policy 1858.10

Updated September 6, 2011 

Wednesday, September 07, 2011 1:33 PM

5.6 Attendance at Meetings and Conferences

Members of the teaching, research, administrative, and extension staffs are encouraged to attend professional meetings, when attendance is beneficial to both the employee and the University. Brief leaves from official duties may be granted by your department head for attendance at such meetings when circumstances permit. The University will reimburse you for part of the travel expenses when travel funds are available and to the extent allowed by University travel regulations. Applications for leave and for travel allowances in connection with attendance at professional meetings must be approved in advance. If you are a non-exempt employee, Human Resources can provide information about Fair Labor Standards Act provisions for travel time.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:42 PM

6. Compensation Policies

6.1 State Compensation Plan

(Uniform Classification and Compensation Act - Arkansas Code Ann. § 21-5-2; AHRMS Policy Manual 205)

Classified positions (see Section 2.1 for definitions) in all state agencies and institutions, including the University, are subject to the Uniform Classification and Compensation Act (Act 199 of 1969), which groups positions with similar types and levels of duties and which require similar knowledge, abilities, skills, education, and experience into classes and assigns a pay grade to each class. The minimum and maximum salaries for each pay grade are set by the Arkansas General Assembly. There are currently thirty pay grades and five levels within each grade. Positions which are not classified do not have pay grades, but are assigned a maximum salary by the General Assembly for each fiscal year and are subject to the constraints of department and University budgets.

Monday, November 21, 2011 1:22 PM

6.2 Compensation at Initial Appointment

(Act 1461 of 2001; AHRMS Policy Manual 220-2, 15, 16, 17, and 19)

If you are employed by the University in a classified position for the first time and have not transferred from another state agency or institution, you will be paid at Level I (entry level) of the pay grade assigned to your job classification. Exceptions to this policy may be made when:

  1. A special entry rate, based on the labor market, has been approved by the chief fiscal officer of the state for your job classification.
     
  2. A special entry rate, based on exceptional qualifications, has been requested and approved by the chief fiscal officer of the state and the state Office of Personnel Management prior to your appointment.
     
  3. You are transferring from a non-classified position to a classified position.
     
  4. You work in a position that is eligible for shift differential.
     
  5. Your specific job assignment requires the skill of communicating in another language, including sign language.
     
  6. Hiring ranges for first time new hires to State government may be authorized by the Office of Personnel Management during the current biennium.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:38 PM

6.3 Compensation upon Rehire

An employee who has been terminated for more than thirty (30) working days and returns to state service will be eligible for his/her previous exit salary. If that salary falls below the entry level of the grade or classification, the salary will be adjusted to the entry level. Additionally, the salary cannot exceed the maximum pay level of the grade, unless the employee is qualified for the career pay level on the career service pay plan.
If a former employee returns to state service within thirty (30) consecutive working days, the employee will be processed as a transfer whether the re-employment is with the former agency/institution or in a different agency/institution.

Friday, May 07, 2010 11:49 AM

6.4 Effects of Promotion, Demotion, and Transfer on Compensation

Promotions
An employee promoted will have the maximum annual salary for which he or she is eligible established as follows:
1. For a promotion to a position of a higher grade on the same pay plan, the employee's maximum rate of pay shall be increased by ten percent (10%).
An employee who upon promotion is receiving a rate of pay below the lowest entrance pay level established for the new grade may be adjusted to that lowest entrance pay level for that grade.
An employee's rate of pay upon promotion shall not exceed the maximum pay level of the grade assigned to the classification, unless the employee is eligible for the career pay level on the career service pay plan.
When an employee promotes to a different agency/institution, the originating agency/institution must pay all accumulated compensatory time and overtime to the employee at the time of transfer.
Non-exempt employees promoting to an exempt classification must have all accumulated compensatory time and overtime paid at the time of transfer.
If you are promoted to another position in your department or accept a position in another department that is in a classification higher than your former classification, ordinarily your pay rate will increase by 10% or will be Entry of the new pay grade, whichever is higher.
Shift Differential - Outside Normal Working Hours
An employee whose working hours do not conform to normal state business hours shall be eligible for additional compensation up to twelve percent (12%) of the hourly rate for which he or she is eligible as a shift differential if:
1. The agency or institution routinely schedules more than one (1) work shift per day.
2. The shift to which the employee is assigned is a full:
1. Evening work shift beginning not earlier than 2:30 p.m. and ending not later than 11:30 p.m.
2. Night work shift beginning not earlier than 11:00 p.m. and ending not later than 8:00 a.m. the next day.
3. The employee is regularly assigned to these shifts on a regularly scheduled rotating basis.
An employee assigned to an evening shift may receive up to six percent (6%).
An employee assigned to a night shift may receive up to twelve percent (12%).
In those instances in which the granting of a shift differential has the effect of temporarily exceeding the maximum annual rate for the grade assigned to the employee's classification, the additional compensation shall not be considered as exceeding the maximum allowable rate for that grade.
Demotions
When an employee is demoted for cause or voluntarily solicits a demotion, his or her rate of pay will be:
1. Fixed in the lower-graded position at a rate equal to ten percent (10%) less than the employee's rate of pay at the time of demotion for demotions of one (1) or more grades on the career service pay plan or on the professional and executive pay plan
If the employee's salary falls below the entry pay level of the new grade upon demotion, his or her salary may be adjusted to the entry level for that grade.
An employee's rate of pay upon a demotion will not exceed the amount provided by the maximum pay level of the grade assigned to the classification, unless the employee is eligible for career pay level on the career service pay plan.
An employee returning within twelve months to a position or classification previously occupied is eligible for a rate of pay no greater than that for which the employee would have been eligible had he/she remained in the lower-graded classification.
An employee who is placed in a lower-graded position on either compensation plan because the original position has expired due to lack of funding, program changes, or withdrawal of federal grant funds may continue to be paid at the same rate as the employee was being paid in the higher-graded position upon approval of OPM after seeking the review of the Personnel Committee.
When an employee demotes to a different agency/institution, the originating agency/institution must pay all accumulated compensatory time and overtime to the employee at the time of transfer.
Non-exempt employees demoting to an exempt classification must have all accumulated compensatory time and overtime paid at the time of transfer.
Transferred Employees
Employees who transfer to a classification of the same grade within an agency/institution or to another agency/institution are eligible to maintain their salary at the time of transfer.
Non-classified employees who transfer to a classified position are eligible to maintain their salary at time of transfer. However, the salary cannot exceed the maximum pay level of the grade, unless the employee is qualified for the career pay level on the career service pay plan.
When an employee transfers to a different agency/institution, the originating agency/institution must pay all accumulated compensatory time and overtime to the employee at the time of transfer.
Non-exempt employees transferring to an exempt classification must have all accumulated compensatory time and overtime paid at the time of transfer.
Rehired Employees
An employee who has been terminated for more than thirty (30) working days and returns to state service will be eligible for his/her previous exit salary. If that salary falls below the entry level of the grade or classification, the salary will be adjusted to the entry level. Additionally, the salary cannot exceed the maximum pay level of the grade, unless the employee is qualified for the career pay level on the career service pay plan.
If a former employee returns to state service within thirty (30) consecutive working days, the employee will be processed as a transfer whether the re-employment is with the former agency/institution or in a different agency/institution.

Monday, May 17, 2010 2:40 PM

6.5 Cost of Living Adjustments

The Arkansas General Assembly may, from time to time, authorize pay increases that represent cost of living adjustments for all classified employees. These increases are not performance-based, but are awarded to all classified employees.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:35 PM

6.6 Merit Pay

(Act 1017 of 2011; Arkansas Code Ann. §21-5-1101)

All pay increases for non-classified employees are merit-based.

Classified merit pay increases are based on the employees' performance evaluations. Merit increases are in addition to any cost-of-living (COLA) increases.

Employees who receive an overall rating of satisfactory, above average or exceeds standards are eligible for a merit increase.*

Classified merit increases will be paid as a lump-sum payment and all merit payments will be considered salary for the purposes of retirement contributions.

Eligibility for Merit Pay (classified)
. Employees who have been appointed for at least 12 months (continuously)
. Employees who have not received a written performance-based or disciplinary reprimand during the previous 12 month rating period.

*Note: Because of reductions in State funding resulting in budget constraints, merit pay may not be funded every fiscal year and merit increase amounts may vary. 

Monday, May 07, 2012 10:36 AM

6.7 Career Service Recognition Payments

(Arkansas Code Ann. §21-5-106; AHRMS Policy Manual 150.0)

If you are employed in a full-time appointed position that is not defined as faculty (see Section 2.1 for definitions), you will become eligible for career service recognition payments when you have completed ten or more years of service in a full-time appointed position or positions at the University. If you have worked for another state agency or state-supported institution of higher education in an eligible position, you will be given credit for your years of full-time service. Proof of prior service is required.

If you are a classified employee, your career service payment will be made on the 15th of the month following your career service eligibility date. If you are a non-classified employee, your payment will be made on the 15th of the month following the anniversary of your last date of hire into a full-time appointed position.

The amount of your annual career service recognition payment will be:

Years of Service

Annual Payment

10 through 14 years of state service

$600

15 through 19 years of state service

$700

20 through 24 years of state service

$800

25 or more years of state service

$900

Starting July 1, 2007, if you are contributing to a retirement plan, Career Service Recognition Payments will be subject to retirement contribution deductions.  These deductions will be matched by the University in the same proportion as deductions from your regular paycheck.  As in the past, Career Service Recognition Payments are subject to state and federal taxes.

Friday, May 07, 2010 11:24 AM

6.8 Procedures for Issuing Pay

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 323.0)

You will be paid monthly, unless you are an extra-help hourly employee. Direct deposit is the standard method by which the University pays employees. You may have your pay deposited in up to six separate accounts. The accounts can be at the same financial institution or as many as six different ones. You may request paper checks by so noting on the direct deposit form, but the University encourages you to have your pay deposited directly to your bank or credit union, for convenience and security. The University's payroll system does not permit a combination of direct deposit and paper checks. Forms to request direct deposit are available in the payroll section of Human Resources or on the web site. Approximately three days before pay day you will receive an e-mail indicating your gross pay, deductions, and the net pay that will be deposited to your accounts. You can also find this information on webBasis. For benefits-eligible employees, this will also provide information on your and the University's payments for benefits and levels of benefits coverage as well as detailed information on leave usage. If you do not use direct deposit, the Treasurer's Office will send your paycheck to the department in which you work for distribution on the last work day of each month. Checks will be delivered and distributed at least eight hours later than the time that electronic transfers are made for employees who use direct deposit, and lost checks will be subject to a replacement fee.

If you are an extra-help hourly employee you will be paid on the 10th and 25th of each month. If that date falls on a Saturday, pay day will be on Friday; if it falls on Sunday, pay day will be Monday. For your convenience and security, you may use direct deposit and receive your pay advisory form via e-mail or the web. Forms to request direct deposit are available at Human Resources.

Friday, May 07, 2010 11:27 AM

6.9 Payroll Deductions

(Arkansas Code Ann. § 19-4-1602; Act 1795 of 2003; Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 322.1)

The University is required by law to withhold part of your pay each month for federal and state income taxes and for social security and Medicare taxes. Early in the calendar year, you will receive a W-2 form which will show your earnings for the previous calendar year and the amounts withheld for income and social security taxes.

You may request that amounts be withheld from your check for other purposes, including retirement contributions; group life, medical, dental, vision care, and long-term disability insurance premiums; flexible spending account payments; United Way, University of Arkansas annual fund and other University of Arkansas Foundation fund contributions; HPER memberships; union dues; and payments for parking permits and fines. If you would like any of these deductions made to your paychecks, the payroll section of the Department of Human Resources can help you.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:29 PM

6.10 Salary Overpayments and Other Amounts Owed to the University

(Board Policy 405.2; Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 329.0; AHRMS Policy Manual, 245.1; Arkansas Code Annotated §26-36-303.)

It is your responsibility to notify Human Resources and your department head immediately of any salary payment errors, including overpayments. Pay advices are issued in advance of payday to help you identify such errors before the erroneous salary payments are made. Department heads are expected to assist and cooperate fully with Human Resources and the Treasurer's Office in efforts to recover salary overpayments.

It is the policy of the State of Arkansas and of the University that an individual may not profit from an error in paying an employee or vendor. The University will vigorously pursue collection of all salary overpayments from former employees in the same manner as it pursues other debts to the University. Salary overpayments that are not repaid immediately will be referred to the Treasurer's Office for collection. The Office of Personnel Services of the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration may submit a claim for overpaid wages against your State income tax refunds.

To reduce the likelihood of salary overpayments to terminating employees, payments for accumulated annual leave will not be made until the fifteenth of the month following your last workday. During this time, you and your department are responsible for ensuring the accuracy of your leave record.

If a salary overpayment is made while you continue to be employed by the University, the overpayment will be deducted from your next pay deposit or check.

If you owe the University any funds other than salary overpayments, the amount owed may be deducted from your paycheck or from other payments due to you, such as payment for accrued, unused leave at the time of termination. If you owe the University money, are currently employed, and have not responded to the past due notices mailed to your home address, an involuntary payroll deduction for the full amount owed will be requested from Human Resources by the Treasurer's Office. A repayment plan may be set up with the department owed to prevent an involuntary payroll deduction. If you are no longer employed, your final settlement with the University will be for the entire amount owed.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:28 PM

6.11 Garnishments and Salary Liens

(Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 440.9; AHRMS Policy Manual, 245-2)

If you have your wages or other amounts due from the University seized by a court order of garnishment, the University is required by law to comply with the court order. Governmental liens resulting from claims for unpaid taxes, bankruptcy claims, and child support orders must also be honored. When the University receives a court order for garnishment or a salary lien, it must pay the required amount directly to the clerk of the court or the governmental agency. Any defenses you may wish to make must be made to the court or governmental agency. As allowed by law, an administrative charge of $2.50 per paycheck will be assessed on child support garnishments.

Because a substantial amount of administrative time and expense is involved in processing wage garnishments and liens, the University has a concern whenever such an order is issued against an employee and served on the University. Grounds for dismissal will exist when two orders of garnishment, two salary liens, or a combination of one of each type of seizure is processed against an employee in any twelve-month period. Multiple garnishment orders resulting from the same debt or the same judgment will be treated as a single garnishment, and multiple assertions of salary liens arising out of the same bankruptcy order or the same debt for taxes due to the same governmental unit will be treated as a single salary lien.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:27 PM

6.12 Travel Expense Advances and Reimbursement

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 332.0; Governor's Policy Directive #6; AHRMS Policy Manual 200-1.4)

Travel advances are made only to University employees who are authorized to travel on official University business. This includes regular appointed faculty, classified, non-classified, and hourly employees, as well as graduate assistants, work-study students, and hourly paid students. You are responsible for repaying any travel advance within five days after your scheduled return from the trip for which it was issued. If you do not repay an advance when it is due, the amount you owe may be deducted from your paycheck. If the University has to deduct the repayment for your travel advances more than once in any twenty-four month period, you will be ineligible for further travel advances for the next twenty-four month period. If your trip is canceled, you must return or repay your travel advance immediately.

You may request and receive a travel advance for up to 50% for domestic travel and 75% for international travel of your total authorized, estimated reimbursable travel expenses. Expenses such as airfare, registration fees, and local car rentals are not eligible for travel advances. Allowable travel advance expenses include, but are not limited to, anticipated meals and lodging costs within the limits allowed by state regulations, anticipated mileage expense at the state-stipulated rate if you are required to use your own vehicle for travel, and anticipated taxi fares.

Travel advances must be vouchered or repaid within five days of your return from the trip for which the advance was made. If a travel advance is still outstanding 30 days or more after your return, the amount may be deducted from your next pay deposit or check. If a deduction for an outstanding travel advance is made twice in a twenty-four month period, you will not be eligible for travel advances for the next twenty-four months. If your trip is cancelled, you must return the travel advance check or repay it immediately.

The amounts which you may be reimbursed for official University travel are regulated by the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration. Specific amounts are designated for meals, lodging, and mileage, with the amounts for meals and lodging varying according to locale. See the travel web site at: http://www.uark.edu/depts/travel/ or your travel administrator for current rates. You may not be reimbursed for meals in-state unless your travel requires an overnight stay.

Friday, May 07, 2010 11:28 AM

7. Paid and Unpaid Leave

7.1 University Holidays

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 409.2, 509.1; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.1; Arkansas Code Ann. §1-5-101 through 104)

The Board of Trustees delegates to the campuses the schedule of official holidays for each fiscal year. There are ordinarily twelve official paid holidays and one or two additional days when the University is closed and which are charged to your annual leave. The usual schedule includes the following holidays: Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, the Friday following Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Martin Luther King's Birthday, the Friday of Spring Break (in lieu of Presidents' Day/Daisy Gatson Bates Day), Memorial Day, and your birthday. Because the University ordinarily closes for the entire week between Christmas Eve and New Year's Day, you will be charged annual leave for any days during that period not covered by regular holidays or additional holidays declared by the Governor. One of the days will be a holiday in lieu of your birthday. If you decide to observe your birthday on the date it occurs, instead of using it in lieu of an annual leave day between Christmas Eve and New Year's Day, be certain to inform your department leave representative as far in advance of your birthday as possible. If you decide to observe your birthday on the date it occurs, you will be charged annual leave for the day your birthday would be observed between Christmas Eve and New Year's Day. If you do not observe your birthday on the date that it occurs and your employment ends before the observed day between Christmas Eve and New Year's Day, you will be paid for the holiday in lieu of your birthday.

Starting in 2003, the Governor has given permission for University employees to work additional hours during the month of December which may be substituted for annual leave on those days when the University is officially closed which are not covered by holidays. Specific instructions will be sent to employees and department leave representatives annually.

When a holiday (except December 25) occurs on a Saturday, the preceding Friday is observed; when December 25 occurs on a Saturday, the following Monday is observed. When a holiday (except December 24) occurs on a Sunday, the following Monday is observed; when December 24 occurs on a Sunday, the preceding Friday is observed.

If you are assigned a work schedule which requires you to work on a regularly-scheduled holiday, you may be granted time off on another date that is convenient for you and your department. If the workload in your department makes it difficult to arrange an alternate day to observe your holiday, you may be paid for the holiday, at your regular pay rate, in accordance with provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

If you are a full-time employee, you are eligible to observe these holidays at full pay. If you work less than full-time, but half-time or more, your holiday pay will be proportionate to the time worked. For example, if you work half-time, your holiday pay will be at a rate equivalent to four hours. You must be in a paid status (not on leave without pay) on your normally scheduled work day before the holiday and your normally scheduled work day after the holiday. If you are a non-student, regular hourly employee and regularly work twenty or more hours a week, you are eligible for pay for University holidays at a rate proportionate to the number of hours you regularly work, provided you work your scheduled day before and your scheduled day after the holiday. Students hourly employees are paid only for hours actually worked. You are considered a student, and therefore not eligible for holiday pay, if you are taking six or more undergraduate credits or five or more graduate credits.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 11:15 AM

7.2 Annual Leave

(Board Policy 420.1, 420.2; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.2, 435.3)

If you work 1,000 hours or more per year in an appointed classified position, and you are not employed in a student title (such as Student Assistant, Professional Student Assistant, Graduate Assistant, Senior Graduate Assistant, or Master Lecturer), you earn annual leave. If you are a full-time employee, you earn annual leave in accordance with the following schedule. If you are not full-time, but work 1,000 hours or more per year, you earn annual leave in proportion to the time you work.

From the

beginning of

Through the

end of

Monthly

Annually

1st year

3rd year

8 hours

12 days

4th year

5th year

10 hours

15 days

6th year

12th year

12 hours

18 days

13th year

20th year

14 hours

21 days

21st year

 

15 hours

22.5 days

If you work 1,000 hours or more per year in a regular appointed non-classified position that is listed as a 12-month position in the University's appropriation act, you earn annual leave. If you work full-time (100% appointment), you earn annual leave at the rate of 15 hours per month or 22.5 days per year. If you work less than full-time in a 12-month non-classified position, but your appointment is 50% or greater, you earn annual leave at that rate, in proportion to the time you work.

Annual leave is cumulative and is added to your annual leave balance as it is earned; however, you may not have more than 30 days (240 hours) on January 1 of each year. Your total accumulated leave may exceed 30 days during the year, but any amount over 30 days is lost if not used by December 31 of each year. If you are a non-exempt employee and your annual leave accumulation is 240 hours or more for the current and the previous month, leave usage that would ordinarily be charged to compensatory time will be charged to annual leave, to help you avoid losing annual leave on January 1 of the next year. Your compensatory time balance will remain available for you to use.

If you transfer to the University from another state agency or institution of higher education, without a break in service, you retain and transfer all of your accumulated annual leave. Your prior service will also be figured into the rate at which you earn annual leave, shown on the chart above. You will receive one year's credit for each full year that you have worked in another state agency or institution of higher education. You will not, however, receive credit for partial years.

Annual leave must be earned before it can be used. You may not borrow from amounts you expect to earn, and you may not use annual leave earned by other employees. You continue to earn annual leave at your normal earning rate when you are on leave with pay. You do not earn annual leave during a month when you are on leave without pay for ten or more days, or an equivalent proportion if your appointment is less than 100%.

You may request annual leave at any time, but your request must be made in advance and must be approved by your supervisor. Your supervisor may require that you take annual leave at those times when it will be most convenient for and least disruptive to your department or work unit. Annual leave is granted on a basis of work days, not calendar days. Non-work days, such as weekends and holidays, which fall within a period when you are using annual leave are not charged against your annual leave. If you exhaust your earned annual leave, you may use compensatory leave, but you may not use sick leave or other forms of leave for annual leave purposes. However, annual leave will be used if you are sick or an immediate family member whom you must care for is sick and you have used all of your sick leave. In the BASIS system, when sick leave is exhausted, additional sick days are charged against annual leave. Annual leave may be used in lieu of sick leave.

If you end your employment with the University for any reason, including termination, retirement, resignation, or death, your final pay will include a lump sum payment for any accrued but unused annual leave, up to, but not exceeding 30 days (240 hours) or 60 days (480 hours) in the case of death. The BASIS Leave Accounting system credits your full monthly accrual of annual leave at the first of each month. If you end employment with the University, your last month's annual leave accrual will be pro-rated to reflect your actual termination date. If you receive a lump sum payment for annual leave, you may not return to University employment until the number of days for which you received annual leave payment have elapsed.

If you are a twelve-month employee and are scheduled to change to a nine-month appointment, you must take all of your accrued, unused annual leave before the end of the twelve-month appointment period. Your employment period cannot be extended to compensate you for unused annual leave when you change from a twelve-month to a nine-month appointment and you cannot receive a lump sum payment for unused annual leave unless you are terminating your employment with the University.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:00 PM

7.3 Sick Leave

(Board Policy 420.1, 420.2); Arkansas Code Annotated § 21-4-501 through 504, § 19-4-1607(b)(2), and § 19-4-1613(a)

If you work at least 1,000 hours per year in an appointed position, and you are not employed in a student title (such as Student Assistant, Professional Student Assistant, Graduate Assistant, Senior Graduate Assistant, or Master Lecturer), you earn sick leave. You earn sick leave at the rate of eight hours, or one day, for each full month of employment, if you work full-time. If you work less than full-time, but 1,000 hours or more per year, you earn sick leave at a rate proportional to the time you work. If you work less than 1,000 hours per year, you do not earn sick leave. You accrue sick leave only when you are in a paid status, including when you are on leave with pay. You do not earn sick leave for any calendar month during which you are on leave without pay for ten or more days, or an equivalent proportion if your appointment is less than 100%.

Your accrued sick leave cannot exceed 120 days (960 hours) on January 1 of each year. Your total accrued sick leave may be more than 120 days during the year, but any amounts over 120 days will be lost if you do not use them by December 31 of each year. The BASIS Leave Accounting system credits your full monthly sick leave on the first of each month. If you end employment with the University, your last month's sick leave accrual will be prorated to correspond with your termination date. If you transfer without a break in service to another state agency or institution of higher education, you will retain your accumulated sick leave. If you are laid off because of budgetary reasons or curtailment of University activities and return to University employment within six months, your accrued, unused sick leave at the time of the lay-off may be restored to your account.

If you are an appointed classified employee, you will be paid for unused, accumulated sick leave when you retire. The amount you are paid will be calculated according to the following formula:

  • If you have accumulated at least 50 days of sick leave, but less than 60, you will receive 50% of the number of days accrued times 50% of your daily salary.
  • If you have accumulated at least 60 days of sick leave, but less than 70, you will receive 60% of the number of days accrued times 60% of your daily salary.
  • If you have accumulated at least 70 days of sick leave, but less than 80, you will receive 70% of the number of days accrued times 70% of your daily salary.
  • If you have accumulated at least 80 or more days of sick leave, you will receive 80% of the number of days accrued times 80% of your daily salary.
  • The maximum payment at retirement will be $7,500.
  • If you die while you are actively employed, a payment for unused sick days will be made to your estate, using the same formula.

If you receive pay for unused sick leave at retirement and return to state employment, you are not required to wait the number of days for which you received the sick leave pay, nor are you required to repay the sick leave compensation.

Sick leave is granted on the basis of work days, not calendar days. Non-work days, such as holidays and weekends, are not charged to sick leave. Sick leave may not be used in addition to or instead of annual leave, but is to be taken only when you must be absent from work because of illness or injury or to keep an appointment with a physician, dentist, optometrist, chiropractor, osteopath, or mental health care provider. You may also use sick leave when a member of your immediate family is seriously ill or dies. Immediate family includes your father, mother, sister, brother, husband, wife, child, grandchild, grandparents, in-laws, or anyone acting as your parent or guardian. If you are absent from work because of a temporary work injury or illness that entitles you to workers' compensation benefits, you may use sick leave as a supplement to your workers' compensation benefits. The combination of workers' compensation benefits and sick leave pay cannot equal more than your regular salary.

If you are absent from work because of an illness or injury or for any other reason that makes you eligible for sick leave, your leave will be charged in the following order: (1) earned sick leave, (2) any earned compensatory or holiday time, (3) earned annual leave, (4) leave without pay, except when you take maternity leave.

If you wish to use sick leave for a medical, dental, or optical appointment, for a scheduled hospital stay, for a funeral, or for any other use that you are aware of in advance, you should make a request to your supervisor, as early as possible. If you cannot come to work because you are ill, you must notify or have someone else notify your supervisor within the first hour of the work day. Some departments may require earlier notice. Notification should be made on the first day you are ill and on each subsequent work day, unless you provide a statement from your physician defining a range of time you will be absent because of illness or injury. If you are returning to work after an extended absence because of illness, injury, or surgery, you should give your supervisor as much advance notice as possible.

If you are absent because of illness or injury for five or more consecutive days, you may be asked to furnish written proof of illness or injury from a doctor. Some departments may require proof of illness or injury after three consecutive days. Fraudulent claims of illness or injury and patterns of abuse of sick leave may result in disciplinary action.

If you are absent from work because of a temporary occupational illness or injury and are entitled to Workers' Compensation benefits, you may use sick leave to supplement your Workers' Compensation so that your weekly pay from both sources is equal to (but does not exceed) your normal pay at the time of the injury or onset of the illness. Your accrued sick leave will be reduced by the amount you use to supplement Workers' Compensation. If you are receiving Workers' Compensation benefits for a permanent disability, you are eligible for full pay from both sources until your accrued sick leave is exhausted.

If you are recuperating from an injury, an illness, or surgery and your doctor approves your return to work but places restrictions on what you can do, the University will make every effort to accommodate the restrictions. You will need to provide a statement from your doctor releasing you to full duty or identifying your restrictions. Your supervisor will review the restrictions to determine whether you can successfully carry out your job responsibilities within the limitations they impose. Your physician may be contacted to obtain further information about your restrictions, and the University Health Center may be consulted for a second opinion, when necessary.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:01 PM

7.4 Leave for Organ or Bone Marrow Donation

(Act 546 of 2003)

If you serve as a human organ donor, you may take up to thirty days additional leave with pay at the time you make the donation. If you serve as a bone marrow donor, you may take up to seven days additional leave with pay at the time of the donation. This leave will not affect your leave accrual or time credited toward career service.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:21 PM

7.5 Bereavement Leave

(Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.3)

You may use sick leave when you are absent from work because of the death of a member of your immediate family. Immediate family means your mother, father, sister, brother, husband, wife, child, grandchild, grandparents, in-laws, or any individual who has acted as your parent or guardian.

If you wish to attend the funeral of anyone outside your immediate family, you should make a request, as far in advance as possible, to your supervisor. Your absence will be charged to compensatory time first, then annual leave, or to annual leave if you have no compensatory time accumulated.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 2:17 PM

7.6 Family and Medical Leave

(The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 - CFR 29-825)

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles you, if you meet its definition of eligible employee (see below), to a total of twelve work weeks of leave during any twelve-month period for one of the following reasons:

  1. The birth of your child and to care for your newborn child;  
  2. The placement of a child with you for adoption or foster care; 
  3. The care of your spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition; or  
  4. A serious health condition that makes you unable to perform the functions of your job; or
  5. Leave for a qualifying exigency for a spouse, child, or parent on covered active duty during deployment to a foreign country.

The FMLA entitles you, if you meet its definition of an eligible employee (see below), to a total of twenty-six work weeks of leave during any twelve-month period for the following reason:

1. To care for a spouse, child, or parent who is injured while serving on active military duty, including veterans who are undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy for serious injury or illness that occurred any time during the five years preceding the date of treatment.

The twelve-month period during which you may take up to 12 weeks of FMLA leave is the calendar year (January through December.) In the case of your child's birth or adoption, the twelve-month period begins with the child's birth or placement. The actual amount of FMLA leave you take after your child's birth or adoption should be mutually agreed upon with your supervisor, taking into account your doctor's recommendations and any birth-related complications or serious health conditions. In the case of military caregiver leave, the twelve-month period begins with the date taken to care for the servicemember.

Family and medical leave is leave without pay. However, the University requires you to use your accrued paid leave for as much of the twelve-week period as it will cover. If the reason for the family and medical leave is the birth or adoption of a child or an illness or injury for which you receive Workers' Compensation benefits, you may take unpaid leave, in accordance with University policies. Paid leave to handle personal and family medical needs is available under the sick leave, annual leave and catastrophic leave policies. Compensatory time off will be counted as part of your FMLA entitlement, but it must be exhausted before you are granted leave without pay, and you may request the use of your compensatory time for an FMLA reason.

When the University becomes aware that your leave is for a purpose covered by the FMLA, it has the responsibility to notify you that you have been placed on FMLA leave. The University must make a determination about whether the leave will count as FMLA leave within five business days of the time you request the leave, or if there is not sufficient information to make the determination, at the point the information becomes available. If the University learns that your leave is for an FMLA purpose after your leave has begun or within five work days of your return to work, the entire leave or a portion of it may be counted retroactively as FMLA leave.

If you take or plan to take leave which meets the FMLA definitions, you must notify your supervisor that the leave was for an FMLA qualified event within five work days of your return to work and it must be designated as FMLA leave so you will have FMLA protection for your absence.

FMLA leave may be taken intermittently or on a reduced leave schedule under certain circumstances.

  1. If you take FMLA leave on an intermittent or reduced leave (part-time) schedule, it will not reduce the total amount of FMLA leave to which you are entitled. Only the amount of leave actually taken is counted toward your twelve-week entitlement. For example, if you normally work five days a week and take one day off for a qualifying FMLA purpose, you will use one-fifth of a week of FMLA leave.
     
  2. You may take FMLA leave intermittently when it is medically necessary. If you request intermittent leave that is foreseeable because of planned medical treatment, your supervisor or department may require you to transfer temporarily to an available alternative position with equivalent pay and benefits but which better accommodates recurring periods of leave.
     
  3. When you take FMLA leave for the birth of your child or the placement of a child with you for adoption or foster care, you may take the leave intermittently only if your supervisor agrees to the proposed arrangement. You may, with your supervisor's agreement, work part-time after the birth or placement of your child or take FMLA leave in several segments, up to the twelve-week cumulative limit. You do not need your supervisor's prior approval for FMLA leave if you are a new mother and have a serious health condition in connection with the birth of your child,if you are a new father and your spouse has a serious health condition in connection with the birth of a child, or if the newborn child has a serious health condition.
     
  4. If you are an expectant mother, you may take FMLA leave before the birth of your child for prenatal care or if your condition makes you unable to work. If you are an expectant father, you may take FMLA leave before the birth of your child to care for your spouse during prenatal care or if she is unable to work due to pregnancy.
     
  5. FMLA leave is designated for leave that is used before the actual placement or adoption of a child if your absence from work is necessary for the adoption or foster care placement to proceed. For example, you may be required to attend counseling sessions, appear in court, consult with your attorney, consult with a doctor who represents the birth parent, or submit to a physical examination.
     
  6. You may use an intermittent or reduced leave schedule to care for a family member in a situation where the family member's condition itself is intermittent, when you need to share care responsibilities with another person, or when you need to make arrangements for changes in your family member's care, such as a transfer to a nursing home.
     
  7. You may take intermittent FMLA leave for your own serious health condition which requires treatment by a health care provider periodically, rather than for one continuous period of time.
     
  8. You may take intermittent or reduced schedule FMLA leave for absences when you are incapacitated or unable to perform the essential functions of your job because of a chronic serious health condition even if you do not receive treatment by a health care provider. If you must care for a family member who is incapacitated by a chronic serious health condition, you may use intermittent FMLA leave to care for him or her even if your family member does not receive treatment by a health care provider, as long as there has been an initial diagnosis by a health care provider and you have submitted the completed certification form (see below.)

To be eligible for FMLA leave, you must have been employed by the University for at least twelve months and must have worked at least 1,250 hours during the twelve-month period prior to the beginning of your leave.

If you and your spouse are both employed by the University, you are entitled to a total of twelve weeks leave, rather than twelve weeks each, for the birth or adoption of a child or to care for a sick parent. However, each of you is entitled to twelve weeks of FMLA leave for your own serious health condition or to care for your child or spouse. You and your spouse are entitled to a combined annual total of twelve weeks of FMLA leave to care for your own parents (not parents-in-law.)

Your use of FMLA leave for your own serious health condition or to care for a seriously ill child, spouse, or parent must be supported by a certificate issued by a health care provider. The certificate must contain the following information: the date on which the serious health condition began, the probable duration of the condition, and the appropriate medical facts within the knowledge of the health care provider regarding the condition. If your FMLA leave is to care for a family member, the certificate must contain a statement that you are needed to care for your child, spouse, or parent, and an estimate of the amount of time required. If the FMLA leave is for your own serious health condition, a statement that you are unable to perform the functions of your job must be included.

FMLA leave designation forms and copies of the certificate to be completed by your or your family member's health care provider are available from your department leave representative or from Human Resources.

If you submit a complete certification signed by a health care provider, the University may not request additional information from your health care provider. However, a health care provider, human resources professional, leave administrator, or management official who represents the University may contact your health care provider, with your permission, to clarify or authenticate the medical certification.  If there is reason to doubt the validity of your medical certification, the University may require a second opinion from a health care provider it designates. If that opinion differs, the opinion of a third health care provider, jointly approved by you and the University, may be solicited. That opinion shall be final and binding. The University will be responsible for the expense of the second and third opinions.

When the necessity for FMLA leave is foreseeable, you must provide the University with a completed Certificate of Health Care Provider form thirty days before your leave begins. If circumstances require that the leave begin in less than thirty days, you should provide as much notice as possible. In cases of illness, you may be required to report periodically on your leave status and your intention to return to work. You may be required to provide recertification on a reasonable basis.  Any medical information which you or your medical care provider submit will be considered confidential.

Upon return from FMLA leave, you will be reinstated in your former position or a position with equivalent benefits, pay, and other terms and conditions of employment. Other than paid leave which you take during the FMLA leave period, you will not lose any benefits accrued prior to your leave. You will not be entitled to any right, benefit, or position other than what you would have been entitled to if you had not taken FMLA leave.

If you participate in the University's group health care benefit plan, your coverage will be maintained, and the University will continue to pay its share of your premium while you are on FMLA leave. You will be responsible for paying the employee portion of your premium. You may choose not to retain your health care coverage during your FMLA leave. If you do so, you are entitled to have your coverage reinstated upon your return to work, without any qualifying period, physical examination, exclusion of pre-existing conditions, or other qualification that did not exist before you went on leave.

If your payment for your portion of the health insurance premium is more than thirty days late, the University's obligation to maintain your health insurance coverage ends. You must be given written notice that your payment has not been received, and that notice must be mailed at least fifteen days before your coverage is to end. The University may recover its share of your health insurance premium paid during unpaid FMLA leave if you fail to return to work for a reason other than a serious health condition or because of circumstances beyond your control. If the University has maintained other benefits, such as life or disability insurance, in order to meet its responsibility to provide equivalent benefits upon your return from FMLA leave, it may recover the costs incurred for paying the premium, whether you return to work or not.

The Family and Medical Leave Act makes it unlawful for an employer to interfere with, restrain, or deny the exercise of the rights provided by this law. It is also unlawful for an employer to discharge or discriminate against any employee who is involved in a proceeding related to the FMLA. Use of Family and Medical Leave cannot be a consideration in decisions to hire, promote, or discipline employees.

The following definitions are used in the FMLA regulations:

Serious health condition means an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that involves:

  1. Inpatient care: Any period of incapacity or treatment in connection with or consequent to inpatient care in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility;
     
  2. Continuing treatment by a health care provider: Any period of incapacity of more than three consecutive calendar days, that also involves continuing treatment as follows:
    1. Treatment two or more times by a health care provider, by a nurse or physician's assistant under direct supervision of a health care provider, or by a provider of health care services (e.g., physical therapist) under orders of, or on referral by, a health care provider; or
    2. Treatment by a health care provider on at least one occasion which results in a regimen of continuing treatment under supervision of a health care provider. A regimen of continuing treatment includes, for example, a course of prescription medication or therapy requiring special equipment to resolve or alleviate the health condition. It does not include taking over-the-counter medications or other similar activities that can be initiated without a visit to a health care provider.
       
  3. Any period of incapacity due to pregnancy.
     
  4. Treatment for a chronic health condition that 1) requires periodic visits (defined as at least twice a year) for treatment by a health care provider, or by a nurse or physician's assistant under direct supervision of a health care provider, 2) continues over an extended period of time (including recurring episodes of a single underlying condition), and 3) may cause episodic rather than a continuing period of incapacity (asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, etc.);
     
  5. A period of incapacity which is permanent or long-term due to a condition for which treatment may not be effective: You or your family member must be under the continuing supervision of, but need not be receiving active treatment by, a health care provider. Examples include Alzheimer's, severe stroke, or the terminal stages of a disease;
     
  6. Multiple treatments for non-chronic conditions: Any period of absence to receive multiple treatments (including any period of recovery there from) by a health care provider or by a provider of health care services under orders of, or on referral by, a health care provider, either for restorative surgery after an accident or other injury, or for a condition such as cancer, severe arthritis, or kidney disease that would likely result in a period of incapacity of more than three consecutive calendar days in the absence of medical intervention or treatment;
     
  7. Continuing supervision of, but not necessarily active treatment by, a health care provider because of a serious long-term or chronic condition or disability which cannot be cured.

NOTE: The FMLA allows leave for substance abuse in order to undergo treatment by a health care provider and specifically excludes employee absence because of the use of the substance. Stress qualifies as a serious health condition only if it rises to the level of a mental illness or results in a physical illness.

Period of incapacity means a period of time when an employee or family member is unable to work, attend school, or perform other regular daily activities because of a serious health condition, treatment therefor, or recovery therefrom.

Treatment, for purposes of FMLA, includes examinations to determine if a serious health condition exists and evaluations of the condition, but does not include routine physical examinations, eye examinations, or dental examinations.

Health care provider is defined as a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who is authorized to practice medicine or surgery by the state in which the doctor practices; or any other person determined by the United States Department of Labor to be capable of providing health care services. Included in the second part of that definition are podiatrists, dentists, clinical psychologists, clinical social workers, optometrists, and chiropractors (limited to treatment consisting of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation as demonstrated to exist by x-ray), nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives, and Christian Science practitioners.

Spouse is defined in accordance with applicable state law. Unmarried domestic partners do not qualify for FMLA leave to care for their partner.

Parent means the biological parent of an employee, or an individual who stands or who stood in loco parentis to an employee, when the employee was a son or daughter. It does not include parents-in-law.

Son or daughter means a biological, adopted, or foster child, a stepchild, a legal ward, or a child of a person standing in loco parentis, who is under eighteen years of age or who is eighteen years of age or older and incapable of self-care because of mental or physical disability.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 11:13 AM

7.7 Maternity Leave

7.7    Maternity/Paternity Leave

(Board Policy 420.1, 420.2; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.2, 435.3, Fayetteville Policies & Procedures 419.0, 419.1)

Maternity/paternity leave is treated as any other leave for sickness or disability, except that an employee may elect to take maternity leave without pay without exhausting her accumulated annual leave and sick leave.  An employee may elect to take paternity leave without pay without exhausting his accumulated annual leave and sick leave.  If you take maternity/paternity leave, you should discuss with your supervisor and your departmental leave representative how you want to use your leave balances prior to beginning your leave.  You should give your supervisor as much notice as possible before you begin maternity/paternity leave and two weeks notice before returning to work from maternity/paternity leave.  Both notices should be in writing. Upon your return from maternity/paternity leave, you will be given the same position or one which is comparable in pay, benefits, and working conditions to the one you held before you went on leave.  Any time that you use maternity/paternity leave, it will be counted as FMLA leave if you meet the FMLA eligibility requirements (see Section 7.6).

Faculty and non-classified staff may choose to seek modified work assignments following childbirth and/or adoption.  For more information on modified work assignments for faculty, view the Faculty Modified Work Assignment for Maternity/Paternity policy in the Faculty Handbook or Fayetteville Policies & Procedures 419.0.  For more information on modified work assignments for non-classified staff, view Fayetteville Policies & Procedures 419.1, Non-Classified Staff Modified Work Assignment.

 

Friday, November 02, 2012 8:34 AM

7.8 Court and Jury Leave

(Board Policy 420.1, 420.2; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.2, 435.3; Arkansas Code Ann. §§ 21-4-213 and 21-5-104)

If you serve as a juror or are subpoenaed as a witness to give deposition in a court or hearing, you are entitled to your regular University pay in addition to any fees paid by the court for your services or necessary appearances, and your absences from work will not be counted as annual leave. You should return to work as soon as your services are no longer needed by the court.

When your service on a jury would cause a hardship to the operation of your work unit, the Chancellor may petition the judge, in writing, asking that you be excused from jury duty. However, if the request is denied or no response is received before the date your jury duty is to begin, you must report for jury duty.

If your service as a witness can be handled by the taking of a deposition rather than court appearance, the deposition is preferable. Depositions or statements which involve the University may be taken during working hours. All others should be handled on personal time.

If you are accepted by the court as an expert witness and are paid a fee in excess of the normal witness fee, you will be required to take annual leave for the time needed for your testimony.

If you are involved in personal litigation or are a paid witness in a case outside the scope of your University employment, you will be required to take annual leave.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 2:31 PM

7.9 Leave for Children's Educational Activities

 (Act 1796 of 2007; Arkansas Code Ann. §21-4-216)

If you are a full-time, benefits-eligible employee, you will receive eight hours of leave each calendar year to participate in, assist with or attend your children's educational activities. Unused children's educational activities leave may not be carried over to the next calendar year and you will not receive compensation for unused children's educational activities leave at retirement or when your employment with the University ends.

For the purposes of children's educational activities leave, "child" is defined as any person enrolled in an educational program for pre-kindergarten through grade twelve (preK-12) who is your natural child, adopted child, stepchild, foster child, grandchild, legal ward or for whom you are the legal guardian or act in any other legal capacity as a parent, or is over the age of eighteen and declared legally incompetent.

Prekindergarten means an educational and child development program that is designed to prepare children who are at least three (3) years of age for an academic kindergarten program.

Educational activities are defined as: parent-teacher conferences, your participation in school-sponsored tutoring, school-sponsored volunteer programs, field trips, classroom programs and academic competitions, and your assisting with athletic, music or theater programs.  Children's educational activities leave may not be used to attend sports activities.

7.9 Updated 7/27/2011
7.9 Updated 2/24/2010
7.9 Updated 8/6/2009

Thursday, July 28, 2011 10:15 AM

7.10 Military Leave

(Public Law 93-508, 94-286; Arkansas Code Ann. §21-4-3, §21-4-105; Board Policy 420.1, 420.2; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.2, 435.3)

If you are a member of the National Guard or of any of the Reserve branches of the Armed Forces of the United States, and are a full-time appointed twelve-month employee, you will be granted fifteen working days of leave, plus any necessary travel time, each year for training. Military leave for annual training or other official duties is granted without any loss of pay, and is in addition to your regular annual leave.

If you are a full-time appointed employee and are drafted or called to active duty in the Armed Forces of the United States or if you volunteer for military service, you will be placed on extended military leave without pay. Any unused sick leave that you have accumulated before you go on extended military leave will be reinstated when you return. All of your unused annual leave will be reinstated when you return, unless you request and receive a lump-sum payment for the accrued, unused annual leave when you go on extended military leave.

However, if you were called to active duty after September 11, 2001, as a member of the National Guard or any of the reserve components of the armed forces by order of the President or the Governor for an emergency or contingency of more than 30 consecutive days, you are entitled to continued salary payments that when combined with your active duty pay, incentives, and allowances, except uniform and clothing allowances, equal the amount that you would otherwise have received but for your required active duty. You must be a current active employee in order to receive such payments, unless your termination was the result of a disability incurred when on active duty. The payment will be made as a one-time lump sum payment and no retirement contribution will be made on the pay. You must present a Leave and Earning Statement showing military pay or Form DD214 showing active duty dates.

If you volunteer or are ordered to active duty for the purposes of specialized training, you will be placed on leave without pay for the period of the training unless you elect to use your accrued annual leave. Leave for specialized training is in addition to your annual military training leave. You will retain your eligibility rights, including your accumulated annual leave, unless you choose to use your annual leave for the specialized training period. You will also retain any accumulated sick leave that you have before you begin the specialized training. Although you will not accumulate annual leave or sick leave during the leave without pay, your annual leave accrual rate will be calculated as though you had not been absent.

You will be granted military leave with pay for up to thirty working days if you are called to active duty in an emergency by the Governor or the President. If the emergency extends beyond thirty days, you may use annual leave and, if necessary, leave without pay. The emergency military leave is in addition to annual military leave for training.

You must make requests for military leave in writing, and you must attach a copy of your military orders to each request for military leave.

When you are released from active duty for military service or for specialized training, you will be reinstated to your former position or to a position with comparable pay and benefits, provided you apply for reinstatement within ninety days of your release from active duty. If you extend your enlistment or re-enlist for additional military service beyond your initial enlistment period for more than four years, or five years when your re-enlistment was at the request of the military, you will lose all reinstatement rights, and will be treated as a rehire.

If you incur a military service-related disability and are scheduled by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to be reexamined or treated for the disability, you are entitled to paid leave of up to six days during any calendar year for reexamination or treatment.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 2:32 PM

7.11 Leave for Members of the Air Force Civil Air Patrol and Coast Guard Auxiliaries

(Act 471 of 2003)

If you are a member of the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary Civil Air Patrol, or the Coast Guard Auxiliary, you will be permitted to take a leave of absence, with pay, for up to fifteen days each calendar year to participate in training programs or emergency and rescue services. The leave of absence must be at the formal request of your wing commander or designated representative or your Division 15 Captain.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:11 PM

7.12 Disaster Service Volunteer Leave

(Arkansas Code Ann. §12-85-102, 12-85-103a)

If you are trained and certified as a disaster service volunteer by the American Red Cross and your specialized disaster relief services are requested by the Red Cross in connection with a disaster, you may receive up to fifteen working days in any calendar year to participate in specialized disaster relief, without loss of pay or benefits. Leave will be granted only for disasters occurring in Arkansas or contiguous states. You must request disaster service volunteer leave in writing, to the Chancellor, and attach a copy of your Red Cross orders to the request.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 2:37 PM

7.13 Leave of Absence Without Pay

(Board Policy 420.1, 420.2; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.2, 435.3; Act 835 of 2003)

Requests for leave of absence without pay should be made to and must be approved by your department head. Leave of absence without pay may be granted to University employees for the following reasons:

  1. An extended absence, requested by the employee, which is in the best interest of the University or which the University is able to accommodate. Classified employees may be granted up to six months' leave without pay, and non-classified employees up to one year's leave without pay. You must make a written request to the Chancellor for approval of your leave of absence without pay, if it is for any reason except those which follow.
     
  2. Necessary absences because of your or your immediate family member's serious health condition (see 7.5 Family and Medical Leave) or because of disability or personal reasons when the absence extends beyond your available earned annual and sick leave. On a case-by-case basis, unpaid leave will be considered as a form of reasonable accommodation for qualified individuals with disabilities.
     
  3. Leave for the birth or placement of a child with you for adoption or foster care (see 7.5 Family and Medical Leave and 7.6 Maternity Leave).
     
  4. Military leave that involves active duty or active duty for specialized training (see 7.8 Military Leave).
     
  5. Employees may be put on leave of absence without pay for disciplinary reasons.  
  6. Employees who do not report to work because of inclement weather conditions may elect to use "leave without pay" in lieu of "annual leave" with approval from their supervisor. Absences due to inclement weather will be treated as an "excused absence."

 You must use all of your accumulated annual leave before you take leave without pay, except when the leave qualifies as maternity leave, certain types of military leave, when the leave is for disciplinary purposes, or for absenses due to inclement weather. You will not earn annual leave or sick leave if you are on leave without pay for ten or more days during a calendar month. You will not be paid for official University holidays while you are on leave without pay.

When you are on leave without pay, you may continue to participate in the University's group insurance programs. However, you must pay the total cost (your part and the University's matching part) of your coverage for any month when you are on leave without pay for ten or more consecutive days. For those benefits provided by the University, with no employee contribution (basic life insurance and long-term disability insurance), you must pay the amount of the University's contribution or risk loss of coverage, except when those benefits are protected by FMLA regulations (see 7.6, Family and Medical Leave).

If you fail to report to work promptly at the end of an agreed-upon period of leave without pay, your employment with the University may be terminated. If there is good reason for the delay, the University may extend your period of approved leave. The Chancellor must approve the extension if it causes your total leave to exceed six months.

Friday, August 19, 2011 10:41 AM

7.14 Educational Leave

(Board Policy 420.1, 420.2; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.2, 435.3)

You may be granted educational leave, with or without pay, to pursue a regular full-time course of instruction, provided that your doing so will be beneficial to the University, and provided the Chancellor approves your application. On your return, you will be expected to continue to work for the University for a period at least twice the length of your course of training, or as required by state statute. If you do not remain with the University for the agreed-upon period, you will be required to pay the University the total cost or a proportionate share of the cost of the out-service training and any compensation paid during the training period. A written contract will be drawn up setting forth the terms of your leave, to be signed by you and the Chancellor. You will retain all of the rights you held in your position at the time leave was granted, including the right to reinstatement to that position or a comparable position on your return. The amount of salary paid during the training period will be agreed upon by you and the Chancellor, but it may not exceed your regular salary. Payments for tuition, fees, books and transportation may be made only if the funds have been specifically appropriated by the Arkansas General Assembly for those purposes.

If you are a non-classified employee, and if you make arrangements to do so in advance, you may, with the permission of the President, use your accumulated annual leave for graduate study. Your accrued annual leave with pay may be accumulated for two calendar years preceding the date of your leave for graduate study, if the leave is used by January 1 of the third year. Your request must be made in writing, in advance of your accruing the annual leave.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 2:39 PM

7.15 Off Campus Duty Assignment

(Board Policy 455.1; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 435.4)

The President of the University is authorized to assign staff members to duties at locations other than the campus when the relocation is to the benefit of the University.

If you are a faculty member or a non-classified administrator who has completed six years of continuous full-time employment with the University or six years of continuous full-time service since a previous Off-Campus Duty Assignment, you may apply for an Off-Campus Duty Assignment. The application must be prepared in accordance with campus regulations available from the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, and must describe the project which you wish to undertake, where it is to be done, and the anticipated value to you and to the University. To be approved, the proposed assignment must be consonant with the needs, objectives, and mission of the campus.

The Off-Campus Duty Assignment is a privilege, not a right. A limited number may be approved by the Board of Trustees each year upon the recommendation of the Chancellor and the President. Assignments should not exceed one semester (or six months for employees on twelve-month appointments) at full salary, or two semesters (or one year for those on twelve-month appointments) at half salary. Within sixty days after returning from an Off-Campus Duty Assignment, you must submit a written report of your activities and accomplishments during the Off-Campus Duty Assignment. In accepting the Off-Campus Duty Assignment, you agree to return to the University for at least one year following the end of the assignment.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:07 PM

7.16 Workers' Compensation

(Arkansas Code Ann. §11-9-514, 529, 701)

If you become injured or ill while you are at work due to a work-related incident, you may be eligible to receive Workers' Compensation. Workers' Compensation is available to you by law to ensure that you get appropriate and reasonable medical care for injuries or illnesses sustained while you are on the job. Should your injury or illness require that you take an extended period of absence from work, you may be eligible for disability benefits through Workers' Compensation. Leave taken because of a serious health condition for which Workers' Compensation benefits are received will be designated as Family and Medical Leave if it meets the definitions in Section 7.6, above. Workers' Compensation claims are submitted to the Office of Risk Management. Determination and payment of claims is made by the Public Employee Claims Division located in Little Rock.

Procedure for Reporting and Treatment of an On-the-Job Injury or Illness

  1. For emergency situations in which the injury or illness might threaten a person's life do the following:
     
    1. Call "911" immediately. The University Police will be dispatched along with emergency medical transportation.
    2. Notify the injured or ill employee's supervisor immediately.
       
  2. For urgent situations which are not life-threatening to the employee, but for which immediate treatment is required do the following:
     
    1. Call the University Police Department (UAPD) at 5-2222. They are trained in first aid and as first responders.
    2. Notify the injured or ill employee's supervisor immediately.
    3. If emergency transportation is not necessary, the injured or ill employee's supervisor will arrange transportation to either the emergency room or to the designated medical clinic, whichever is appropriate.
       
  3. For non-emergency situations which require medical attention during normal business hours (7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. on Saturdays), do the following:
     
    1. Notify your supervisor as soon as possible.
    2. Your supervisor or someone on your supervisor's behalf will make an appointment for you at the medical clinic designated for you by the University.
       
  4. For non-emergency situations which require medical attention before or after normal business hours (7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. on Saturdays).
     
    1. Notify your supervisor as soon as possible.
    2. Your supervisor or someone on your supervisor's behalf will transport you to the nearest emergency room.
    3. Your supervisor or someone on your supervisor's behalf will schedule follow-up care as soon as possible at the designated physician's office after treatment at the emergency room.
       
  5. After treatment at the hospital and/or at the designated medical clinic, you or someone on your behalf must provide your supervisor with any information provided by the physician's office regarding your medical condition including:
     
    • follow-up appointment dates;
    • diagnosis of the injury or illness;
    • prognosis for recovery;
    • any specific work restrictions; and
    • the date you can return to full duty.

    This information should be given to your supervisor within twenty-four hours from the date of the physician's visit or the following business day, whichever is applicable.

Medical Providers

The University is committed to ensuring that you receive appropriate medical care. Medical providers designated by the University to provide medical care for injured or ill employees are:

  • the Arkansas Occupational Health Center (AOHC) located at the Lowell Medical Center; or
  • for minor injuries such as minor cuts, scrapes, bruises, tetanus shots, exposure to poison ivy and minor burns, the University Health Center located on the Fayetteville campus; or
  • for employees who are not located on the Fayetteville campus or are located at least 30 miles from the Fayetteville campus, a physician's office specified by your supervisor and listed on the Corvel network.

Your supervisor or a representative of the supervisor will arrange medical care for you. Except for emergencies, you must report your injury or illness to your supervisor prior to seeking medical attention. If you do not report your injury or illness you may not be eligible for Workers' Compensation.

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 2:43 PM

7.17 Catastrophic Leave Bank

(Acts 91 and 169 of 1991, amended by Act 1176 of 1999 and Act 194 of 2003; Arkansas Code Ann. § 21-4-203, 21-4-214, 6-63-601, 6-63-602)

The University has a catastrophic leave bank program to which you can donate accrued sick leave and annual leave for use by employees who have a catastrophic illness or who have an immediate family member with a catastrophic illness, and whose own leave has been exhausted. You may also apply for catastrophic leave if you need it and meet the eligibility criteria. Some specific details of the University's program follow:

  1. Catastrophic illness: A medical condition of an employee or of the spouse, parent, or dependent* child of the employee, as certified by a physician, which requires the employee's absence from duty for a prolonged period of time and which results in a substantial loss of income for the employee because of the exhaustion of all earned sick, annual, holiday, and compensatory leave time.
  2. Eligibility: You must be a full-time (100% appointed) employee to participate in the Catastrophic Leave Bank Program. To receive benefits under the program, you must have at least two years of service with the University or the University and another state agency or institution of higher education. The employment does not have to be continuous, but it must have been full-time employment in a regularly benefited position. You must have exhausted all of your sick, annual, holiday, and compensatory leave, and as a result, face a substantial loss of income because of your, your spouse's, parent's or dependent* child's medical condition. Your own injuries or illnesses that are covered and compensated by workers' compensation are eligible under the Catastrophic Leave Bank Program, but your workers' compensation and catastrophic leave compensation, combined, may not exceed the compensation you received before the onset of your illness or injury. If you have been disciplined for any abuse of leave during the previous two years, you are not eligible to participate in the program. You must have at least 80 hours of accrued, unused, combined annual leave and sick leave at the onset of the catastrophic illness or injury. This requirement may be waived by the Chancellor or the Chancellor's designee under extraordinary circumstances.
  3. Donations: Donations to the Catastrophic Leave Bank Program are optional. You do not need to donate to be eligible to receive benefits. No one may directly or indirectly intimidate, threaten, or coerce you or any other employee in connection with donating, receiving, or using annual leave, sick leave, or catastrophic leave. You may not donate if doing so would reduce your combined accrued annual leave and sick leave balance to less than 80 hours. Donations can only be made in one hour increments, and there is no limit to the amount of hours that may be donated.  You may donate annual leave or sick leave, or a combination of the two. Donations from active employees are taken only during the annual donation drive, normally held in the month of November. If you leave the University, you may donate unused hours of sick leave, annual leave, or a combination of the two, at the time you terminate your employment. The Chancellor may extend the donation period on a case-by-case basis.
  4. Application for use: Applications for the Catastrophic Leave Bank Program are available in your department office and on the Human Resources web site at http://hr.uark.edu. When you request catastrophic leave, your department must verify that you have not been disciplined for leave abuse, and you must provide a copy of your physician's diagnosis detailing your condition.  It is important to explain the reasons for regular use of sick leave.  After your application has been reviewed by your supervisor and your dean, director, or department head, it will be sent to Human Resources for verification and for submission to the Catastrophic Leave Bank Committee for review. The committee is composed of nine University employees who review applications on a first-filed, first-considered basis. The Catastrophic Leave Bank Committee makes a recommendation on each application to the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration, who makes the final decision to grant or deny catastrophic leave.
  5. General rules: If you are granted catastrophic leave, you will continue to receive your normal pay and benefits, such as contributions to insurance and retirement, but your next salary increase will be delayed for the same number of days you are on catastrophic leave or leave without pay. While you are on catastrophic leave, you will continue to accrue leave, in accordance with University policies, but any leave you earn while you are on catastrophic leave must, as a condition of your voluntary participation in the program, be assigned to the Catastrophic Leave Bank. You may also meet the eligibility requirements for the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).  If so, all catastrophic leave time will be charged against your twelve-week FMLA entitlement for the calendar year in which it occurs (Section 7.6). Catastrophic leave is limited to six months, or 1040 hours, in a twenty-four month period, unless you have been denied disability, retirement, or social security benefits. If you do not report to work at the end of your period of catastrophic leave, you may be terminated unless you provide a satisfactory reason for not returning before the date you are scheduled to return to work. The Catastrophic Leave Bank Program does not create any expectation or promise of continued employment. Further information about the program is available from Human Resources.

*A child who may be claimed as a dependent under the Arkansas Income Tax Act of 1929.

Tuesday, November 01, 2011 3:17 PM

7.18 Voting

In most communities, polls remain open long enough to allow you time to vote before or after working hours. In cases of extreme hardship, such as having to travel a great distance to your polling place, you may be permitted to report to work late or to leave early in order to vote. The time permitted for this purpose is given to you with pay and without reduction of your sick leave, annual leave, or any other benefit. If it is necessary for you to use this privilege, please notify your immediate supervisor before election day.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:02 PM

7.19 Leave Reporting

All leave taken must be reported, using the University's standard form available on the Human Resources web site at http://hr.uark.edu/ or an approved alternative form. There are separate forms for exempt, non-exempt, and hourly employees. The leave report form must be signed by both the employee and his or her supervisor and be retained by the department for seven years, in accordance with Arkansas law.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:01 PM

8. Other Employee Benefits

8.1 Social Security

As a University employee, unless you are a full-time student and work less than twenty hours a week, you are covered by federal Social Security and Medicare insurance. You pay a portion of the tax to fund this coverage when it is withheld as a percentage of your gross salary. The University pays a matching amount which is credited to your account. The percentage of your gross salary which is withheld for Social Security and Medicare is set by federal law. If you have any questions about benefits under the Social Security system, call or visit the local Social Security Administration offices. You may request specific information about your own Social Security account, and should do so periodically, to ensure that your account is being credited properly. The Social Security Administration requires, for your benefits protection, that the name under which you are paid and to which your Social Security payments are credited must be identical to the name on your social security card.

Monday, September 28, 2009 3:00 PM

8.2 Flexible Spending Accounts

The University offers flexible spending accounts, under a Section 125 cafeteria plan, which allow you to use pre-tax dollars to pay for medical care and care for dependents. Each year, you may designate a portion of your salary which will be placed in an individualized account before federal, state, and social security taxes are deducted. You may then be reimbursed from your account for eligible health or dependent care expenses. The flexible spending account may allow you to reduce your taxes while increasing your spendable income. There are two types of flexible spending accounts:

  1. The medical care reimbursement account can be used to pay certain out-of-pocket medical expenses not covered by your insurance plans, such as unreimbursed dental expenses and medical insurance deductibles and co-payments.
  2. The dependent care reimbursement account can be used to pay those costs for care of your dependents that allow you and your spouse, if you are married, to work. Expenses that are eligible for reimbursement include day care or after-school care expenses for your child who is under age 13 and care for your spouse or other adult dependent who is incapable of self-care.

Although you may set up both types of account, you may not use your medical care reimbursement account to pay for dependent care nor your dependent care reimbursement account to pay for medical expenses. It is important, therefore, to estimate your needs for each purpose as accurately as possible at the beginning of every year and to anticipate any changes that may occur during the calendar year, such as your pre-school child starting kindergarten in the fall.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:59 PM

8.3 Health Insurance

(Board Policy 430.1) The University provides a self-insured medical plan which is administered for it by a third-party administrator, QualChoice of Arkansas, Inc. If you are a regular appointed employee who works twenty or more hours a week, an eligible retiree, or an eligible disabled employee, you and your eligible dependents may enroll in the University's health insurance plan, provided you do so within thirty-one days of your initial employment.

You may choose coverage under either a point-of-service plan or a classic managed-care plan. If you live in the four-county area of Northwest Arkansas, you must also choose one of two physicians groups. If you are a retiree who lives out of state or an active employee whose work assignment is out of state, you may choose an indemnity plan. If you are a full-time employee, the University will pay a significant portion of your monthly premium costs, and your (smaller) share of the premium will be deducted from your paycheck. The University will pay a somewhat greater percentage of your premium if you choose the classic plan If you are less than 100% appointed, you will pay a proportionately larger share of the health insurance premiums.

Visit or call the benefits section of Human Resources or go to the Human Resources website (http://hr.uark.edu/) for specific details of the University's health insurance plan, including eligibility criteria, enrollment forms, plan benefits and exclusions, premiums, and lists of participating physicians, hospitals, and other health care providers.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:58 PM

8.4 Vision Care

If you are on a regular appointment of 50% or greater, you are eligible to enroll in a separate group vision care plan that covers eye examinations, glasses, and contact lenses. There is a co-pay and some limitations on frames, lenses, and lens coatings. You do not have to be enrolled in the group medical insurance plan to participate in the vision care plan. Details about benefits and premiums, which you pay in full, are available from the benefits section of Human Resources. The University will continue to offer this plan only if there is sufficient enrollment. A free eye examination is offered every other year under the University's health insurance plan.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:57 PM

8.5 Long-Term Disability Insurance

(Board Policy 430.3)

The University pays the full cost of your basic long-term disability insurance policy if you are an active, regular appointed employee who works twenty hours a week or more. Your coverage is automatic, starting with your first day of work. If your annual salary is more than $20,000, you may purchase additional optional long-term disability coverage to increase your benefits. You pay the total cost of the optional coverage, which will be deducted from your paycheck. Both the basic and the optional long-term disability insurance policies are designed to coordinate with other forms of disability insurance, such as social security and workers' compensation, to provide you with total monthly payments, until you retire or reach age 65, equal to 60% of your salary before you became disabled. Payments begin in the seventh month of your long-term disability.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:56 PM

8.6 Life Insurance

(Board Policy 430.2)

The University provides basic term life insurance at no cost to you, if you are an active, regular appointed employee not in a student title who works at least twenty hours a week. You must complete an enrollment form and designate beneficiaries. The plan pays your beneficiaries a benefit equal to your annual salary, up to a maximum of $50,000. When your pay increases, your coverage is automatically adjusted. If you are age 65 or older, your benefits will be reduced. The benefits section of Human Resources can provide further information about this and other insurance benefits.

You may buy additional life insurance through the University for yourself and your dependents. You pay the full cost of this coverage, and must enroll within thirty-one days after your first day of work, unless you provide proof of insurability. Optional life insurance increases your coverage, and pays your beneficiaries amounts equal to one, two, three, or four times your annual salary, up to a maximum of $500,000.

You may buy dependent life insurance for your spouse and eligible dependents. The policy allows you to choose $10,000, $15,000, or $20,000 coverage on your spouse. Each eligible dependent who is six months to 19 years of age, if not a full-time student, and 25 years of age, if a full-time student, is covered for 50% of the amount you elect for your spouse. Children older than fourteen days but younger than six months have $1,000 of coverage.

Accidental death and dismemberment insurance is available for you and your eligible dependents. If you or a covered dependent die as the result of an accident, on or off the job, the beneficiary will receive a benefit based on the amount of coverage you select. You may choose coverage for yourself in increments of $25,000 up to $300,000. Coverage in excess of $150,000 is limited to the lesser of 15 times your annual salary or $300,000. If you choose dependent coverage, your spouse's coverage is 60% of your amount, and each eligible dependent is covered for 20% of your amount. The plan may also pay partial benefits if a covered person is seriously injured or loses a limb or eyesight.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:55 PM

8.7 Retirement Benefits

(Board Policy 425.2, 425.5; Arkansas Code Ann. §24-4-301 et seq., §24-7-101 et seq.; Act 218 of 2003)

If you have a half-time or greater appointment and are not a student employee, you are eligible for retirement benefits under the University's 403(b) and 457(b) defined contribution plans or the Arkansas Public Employee Retirement System defined benefit plan. If your initial appointment with the University started on or before January 1, 1994, you are included in the University's plan, unless you specifically elect, within 31 days of your appointment, the alternative coverage offered by the Arkansas Public Employee Retirement System. If you have been a member of the Arkansas Teacher Retirement System for at least five years, you may elect the alternative of continued participation under that system. The choice you make within 31 days of your appointment is irrevocable. It cannot be changed at a later date. You must complete enrollment documents for the plan you choose.  Your participation will begin on the first day of the month coinciding with or following your enrollment.

The University will contribute an amount equal to five percent of your regular salary to your retirement account. In addition, the University will match your own contribution, up to ten percent. This means that, if you contribute nothing, the University contributes five percent. If you contribute six percent, the University contributes six percent. If you contribute seven percent, the University contributes seven percent, and so on, up to ten percent. If you contribute more than ten percent, the University will still contribute ten percent. You may elect to make your retirement contributions in pre-tax dollars, by completing a salary reduction agreement that designates the percentage of your regular salary you choose to contribute to your retirement account. That amount will be credited to your retirement account before federal and state taxes are deducted. Contributions are subject to limitations under the Internal Revenue Service code.

The current funding sponsors for the University's 403(b) and 457(b) defined contribution plans are Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association - College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF) and Fidelity Investments. Funds are transferable within and among several investment fund choices. Specific information is available from the benefits section of Human Resources.

Benefits from both your and the University's contributions are vested immediately if you are a faculty member or a non-classified staff member, or if you are a classified staff member whose initial employment was before January 1, 1985 and you made any contributions prior to that date. For all other employees, vesting occurs after you have completed three years of service, reached age 65, or have contributed at least five percent of your salary for six consecutive months, whichever comes first. Employees who work for the University in positions not normally eligible for benefits, except undergraduate students taking 12 hours or more, may participate in the retirement plan, but they will not receive matching contributions from the University.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:54 PM

8.8 Enrollment in University Courses

(Board Policy 440.1, 475.1; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 445.1; Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 512.0)

If you are a full-time appointed employee, you, your spouse, and your dependent children are eligible for education benefits at reduced rates.  If you are employed by the University as of the final day of registration for any semester or session, you and your eligible family members may  enroll in courses offered that semester or session. You, your spouse, and your dependents must meet normal admission requirements in order to enroll.  Tuition waiver benefits are available to eligible employees, spouses and dependents at any campus of the University of Arkansas System.  The benefit will provide a reduction only  to tuition applied to  for-credit classes.  You are responsible to pay all remaining fees in full.

You may take any combination of undergraduate and graduate semester credit hours, up to eleven credit hours each semester, during the fall and spring semesters, and up to three semester credit hours  during each  summer term, when the dates of enrollment are not concurrent.  Class enrollment is approved on a space available basis.    You will receive a  90% discount of the cost of tuition for courses offered on the Fayetteville campus.  Employees enrolled in on-line courses are responsible for paying any additional course specific charges above the regular tuition rate. 

If you have been employed full-time and have been continuously attending classes prior to and after July 1, 2005, you will be granted a scholarship for the difference between 10% of the cost of tuition and $5.00 per credit hour on the Fayetteville campus until you complete your degree program in progress prior to July 1, 2005, cease to continuously attend classes unless an exception is granted, or enroll in any class that is not directly connected to a degree program in progress prior to July 1, 2005.    

You are eligible for a 70% discount for enrollment at other University system campuses.  Law school, medical school, correspondence courses, non-resident tuition, and fees other than tuition are not included in this policy.

Your spouse and dependent children may take up to 132 undergraduate semester credit hours at 50% of regular tuition, or 60% of the full tuition if they enroll at other University system campuses. Graduate school, law school, medical school, correspondence courses, non-resident tuition is not included. Fees other than registration fees are not covered by this policy.

Spouses who have not remarried and dependent children of deceased employees who died while employed full-time by the University are also eligible for tuition discounts. Employees who have been awarded Emeritus status s are eligible for waiver of enrollment fees on a space-available basis. The spouse and dependent children of emeritus employees may receive tuition discounts with the review and approval of the Chancellor. Public employees assigned to the Fayetteville campus to administer or assist with a program, such as ROTC, are considered employees for tuition benefits purposes even though they are not employed or paid by the campus.

Your eligibility for enrollment at reduced rates must be verified by your immediate supervisor. Enrollment during regular working hours, including your lunch period and breaks, is limited to one course per semester, not to exceed five semester credit hours.

Released time, during working hours, for enrollment in classes is a privilege, not a right, and is not automatically permitted. Your supervisor must approve your request for released time, and when considering your request, may take into account factors such as your job performance, the applicability of the course work to your position, the benefit to you and the University, and your department's ability to maintain its necessary office hours and functions. Your department may require you to take annual leave for the hours you spend in class during your regular working hours. Courses taken at the Fayetteville campus during working hours are limited to one course per semester, not to exceed five hours.

Both you and your supervisor must sign the form requesting the tuition discount. You must complete the request form for yourself or your dependent (Employee Request for Registration Fee Discount or Fee Discount Form, Spouse/Dependent of Employee) and submit it at the time of registration. If the form is not processed before the payment deadline, you may be assessed a late fee. Request forms are available from and should be returned to the Treasurer's Office. Under certain conditions, the value of your reduced tuition may be considered taxable income by the Internal Revenue Service.  

Wednesday, March 03, 2010 4:59 PM

8.9 Employee Assistance Program

The University provides an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for all employees who are 50% appointed or greater and who are not students. You and members of your immediate family who live in the same household may use the EAP's services. The EAP is designed to help identify and resolve personal and job-related problems that may affect your job performance. These include health, marital, family, financial, legal, emotional, stress, alcohol, drug and other similar concerns.

The EAP also offers training sessions and workshops that address personal and organizational issues that may affect work performance and provides consultation for supervisors dealing with a variety of work-related issues. The EAP will provide stress debriefing in the event of a critical incident that affects the campus.

Use of the EAP is voluntary. Choosing to participate in the programs of the EAP, or not to participate, will not affect your job status or your opportunities for promotion, but it will also not excuse you from following University policies and procedures concerning job performance and conduct. You may decide to make an appointment to visit the EAP or your supervisor may refer you to the EAP if there are problems with your work performance or your conduct at work. However, it is your choice to accept or not accept your supervisor's referral to the EAP. If the EAP refers you to another source of help, the decision to accept that referral is also your own choice and responsibility.

All aspects of your contact with the EAP are confidential and will not be disclosed without your written authorization. An exception is that state and federal laws require, for example, that the EAP report to the appropriate authorities if you make a threat to your own or someone else's life. EAP records are maintained in the EAP offices and will not become a part of, or be referred to in your personnel file, benefits file, medical file, or any other file that may be accessed by any individual, department, or organization.

You may visit the EAP during work hours if you coordinate your visits with your supervisor. You will not be charged annual leave or sick leave if you make arrangements with our supervisor when you visit the EAP. The EAP may confirm to your supervisor that you kept your appointment and how long the appointment lasted, but not what was discussed during your appointment or the reason you visited the EAP. The EAP can schedule appointments outside of work hours or you may use your accrued sick leave or annual leave if you wish to keep your visits to the EAP confidential.

If you are a benefits-eligible employee, the services of the University's EAP are free to you and members of your household. If the EAP makes a referral to an outside provider, you will be responsible for any costs associated with those services that are not covered by your medical insurance.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:52 PM

8.10 New Employee Orientation
On the scheduled orientation dates after you begin working for at the University (or sooner, if possible), you should attend a new employee orientation session. Subjects covered in the orientation include an introduction to the University of Arkansas and the campus community, information about the Staff Handbook, affirmative action and sexual harassment policies and procedures, diversity initiatives, environmental health and safety, and University benefits, among other topics. You will have an opportunity to enroll in benefits programs at or immediately after the session. New employees may register at http://hr.uark.edu/newemployees/neo.aspx or call Human Resources at 575-5351.

Monday, March 14, 2011 1:42 PM

8.11 Employee Training and Development

University of Arkansas Human Resources coordinates an on-going program of free or low-cost employee development sessions and courses designed to help you do your work more efficiently and manage your relationships and other life activities more effectively. A training calendar is maintained on the Human Resources web site, and you can sign up for classes on-line. Training opportunities are also listed on the Campus Calendar on the University web site and are announced on Arkansas Newswire, which is distributed daily via e-mail. General or customized training is also available to colleges, departments, and other University units.

Human Resources sponsors a supervisor development program which offers, each semester, required and elective courses designed to help supervisors increase and improve their skills. A number of other University departments offer short courses and other training opportunities that will help you develop your skills and abilities. Many of these courses and programs are also announced on the training web site. For information about scheduled classes and other resources, or to suggest programs that would be helpful to you, e-mail or call the employee development coordinator in Human Resources. The e-mail address is hr.training@uark.edu, and the telephone number is 575-4432.

All staff are encouraged to attend employee development and training sessions offered on campus. Discuss the training schedule with your department head to help determine which training opportunities are related to your work or would be helpful for you to attend.

Friday, May 07, 2010 11:58 AM

8.12 Dual Career Employment Network

If you have relocated to northwest Arkansas to work for the University and are part of a dual-career family, the second wage-earner in your household may be eligible for assistance in identifying employment in the area through the Dual Career Employment Network. The Network, which consists of over 100 employers in northwest Arkansas, is a free resource and referral service available to partners of employees recently relocated or of candidates being actively recruited by participating companies and organizations. The program's goal is to inform community employers of the availability of talented professionals as well as to inform relocating family members about employment opportunities.

The Network coordinator will help your spouse, partner, or other family member identify career opportunities with the University, or with local businesses, agencies, schools, and other employers, and will distribute his or her resume, make initial contacts, and help arrange interviews. While the Dual Career Employment Network cannot guarantee that it will be able to identify the right job for the second worker in your family, its services will be available for up to a year after you relocate. Information about the program and participating employers is available on the Human Resources web site and from the Dual Career Employment Network coordinator in Human Resources, who can be contacted by phone at 575-8625.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:48 PM

8.13 Unemployment Compensation

The University contributes to the state unemployment insurance fund, and under certain circumstances, you may be eligible for unemployment compensation benefits when you are no longer employed by the University. You may file a claim for unemployment benefits at any local Arkansas Employment Security Department office.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:47 PM

9. Employee Conduct

9.1 Use of the University's Name and Logos

(Board Policy 100.7; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 215.1)

The Trademark Licensing Program regulates, promotes, and protects the use of the University's name and identifying trademarks such as the University seal and other identifying marks or logos, identifying names such as "Razorbacks," "Hogs," and "University of Arkansas," and products, promotions, and advertising upon which these marks are used. Prior written consent is required from the Trademark Licensing Program for any use of the University name or marks other than official University business.

The name of the University of Arkansas is used in many official business contexts and for a wide range of purposes. It is important to the institution that the use of the name "University of Arkansas" be limited to activities which are in fact activities of the University. The following broad clarifications are applicable to most uses of the name of the University:

  1. Public Appearance: Public appearances by individual faculty, staff, and students almost inevitably involve the use of the name of the University. When University representatives appear on commercially sponsored radio and television programs, they should be identified as guests. Appearances on unsponsored radio and television programs are considered simply as public appearances and impose only normal obligations for responsibility and good taste.
     
  2. Sponsorship of Activities: When the name of the University is used in connection with seminars, institutes, conferences, workshops, short courses, and other such activities, the University must in fact be a sponsor, cooperating through an extension or departmental unit.
     
  3. Public Statements: The Chancellor of the University is responsible for official statements affecting the University, and the President is responsible for news releases affecting the University system.

Guidelines for the use of the University logo and seal, the printing of University stationery, and the identification of University publications are available from University Relations.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:19 PM

9.2 Use of University Property and Facilities

(Board Policy 705.1; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 325.1, 715.1, 720.1; Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 313.3, 313.4, 406.0, 718.0, 722.0, 727.0, 732.0; Governor's Policy Directive #5; AHRMS Policy Manual 200-1.3)

You may use University equipment and supplies only for work-related purposes. University computers, telephones, long-distance authorization codes, calling cards, fax machines, cell phones, photocopying machines, vehicles, machinery, tools, disposable supplies, and other equipment and materials may not be used for personal activities. University equipment may not be discarded, but must be disposed of in accordance with established procedures.  University bulletin boards, except for designated ones in the Arkansas Union, may not be used for private or commercial activities. The campus mail service may be used only for University purposes. Unauthorized or personal use of equipment or supplies may be grounds for dismissal.

If an emergency or other unforeseen and extraordinary situation requires you to accept a collect call, use a long distance authorization code, calling card, or other service for personal purposes, you should make reimbursement promptly to the University, credited to the specific cost center to which the original charge was made. Personal use of University cell phones that does not conflict with University use is permitted, but should be limited in both occurrence and duration and is not a perquisite or entitlement. Any additional costs incurred by the University for personal, non-business-related use of University-provided cell phones must be reimbursed by the employee on a regular basis, no less than semi-annually or when accumulated personal expenses exceed $25, and credited to the specific cost center to which the original expense was charged.

University facilities are primarily for educational activities. When they are not required for regularly-planned educational programs, they may be made available for extracurricular use by colleges, departments, and other University units; by organizations composed exclusively of faculty and staff; by organizations which exist solely for the benefit of the University; and by recognized student organizations with the approval of their advisor. Under law, University facilities cannot be made available to other organizations for their own purposes. However, when a facility is not in use for a regularly-scheduled educational activity or for an extracurricular use by one of the University organizations listed above, the Chancellor may approve the use of the facility when the use serves the educational objectives of the University.

It is an objective of the University to provide opportunities for the University and broader communities to see and hear major leaders of the state, nation, and world. Speeches and debates by or on behalf of candidates for major state and national offices may be scheduled in University facilities under arrangements which allow reasonable opportunities for opposing candidates or points of view. It must be made clear that the University neither supports nor opposes the views stated by or the candidacy of such individuals.

Reservation forms for the use of University facilities are available from the Arkansas Union Programs Office, the Office of the Director of the Physical Plant, and from the officials responsible for scheduling University buildings and facilities.

Roofs of buildings and exterior sides of buildings are not intended for general uses. No rooftop research or classroom uses are permitted and no machinery, equipment, antennae, greenhouses, or other property may be installed on any roofs or roof edges without the written permission of the Director of the Physical Plant. Rappelling and climbing are specifically prohibited.

In-line skates, roller skates, skateboards, and any similar skating equipment may be used on campus or other University property for individual transportation purposes only. Jumping and skating on handrails, walls, benches, fountains, steps, and raised surfaces is prohibited, as is skating in buildings, parking structures and parking lots, campus streets and service drives, or other areas with restricting signs.

Pets, other than service animals used by people with disabilities or animals under the control of academic departments and used for approved teaching and research purposes, are prohibited on campus.

While visitors are welcome to campus, you should not have children, other family members, or friends as a regular presence in your workplace. Exceptions may be made in response to special circumstances for short periods of time and must be approved by your supervisor.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:18 PM

9.3 Serving the Public

The University is supported by the State of Arkansas and serves its people through teaching, research, and public service. The University's success in carrying out its mission depends to a large extent on how you treat the public. You play an important role in building and maintaining good relations with the public, because the University is judged not only on the quality of its graduates, but also on interactions with you and other employees. You are expected to treat every member of the public courteously in your correspondence, e-mails, telephone conversations, and personal interactions with them when they visit the campus.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:17 PM

9.4 Handling Confidential Information

(Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act)

Your work for the University may give you access to academic, personnel, or budgetary information that is considered confidential. You are expected to respect the confidentiality of such information and not disclose it to anyone who does not have an official need for it. If you have any question about the confidentiality of information entrusted to you or to which you have access, ask your supervisor. The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, also known as FERPA or the Buckley Amendment, prohibits, with certain limited exceptions, the release of information from a student's educational records unless the student has given written consent. Questions about FERPA compliance can be answered by the Registrar's Office or the General Counsel.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:16 PM

9.5 The Arkansas Freedom of Information Act

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 207.0; Arkansas Code Ann. §25-19-101 et seq.; Act 1093 of 1999; AHRMS Policy Manual 115)

Under the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act, University documents, with some exceptions, are considered public records, and must be made available to the public for inspection during regular business hours. Records covered by the act include data compilations in any format, including papers, microfilm, microfiche, computer disks and tapes, e-mail, and audio and video recordings. Freedom of Information requests must be responded to within three days of the date when a written request is received. The public may also request that disclosable documents be copied, but the University will charge a fee for copying. If you receive a Freedom of Information request, you should report it to your department head, who should consult the administrator designated in Appendix A of Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 207.0 as custodian of those particular records, and, if necessary, discuss the request with the University's General Counsel. All requests by news media must be made, in writing, to the Office of University Relations.

Generally, personnel records are exempt from disclosure under the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act. Evaluation or job performance records are disclosable only if they formed the basis for the suspension or termination of an employee, the administrative resolution of the case is complete, and there is a compelling public reason for their disclosure. Medical records and academic records are also exempt from disclosure. However, you or your designated representative may view your own personnel records. See also Section 3.4. Also exempt are state income tax records, medical records, academic records, some law enforcement records, records which would give an advantage to competitors or bidders, and library records.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:15 PM

9.6 Political Activities

9.6 Political Activities

(Board Policy 465.1; Governor's Policy Directive # 9; Arkansas Office of Personnel Management Policy 70.12)

As a citizen, you have the right to engage in political activity. However, you must do so on your own time, outside of working hours or when you are on annual leave or leave without pay, and you must maintain appropriate supporting records. You may not use your University title, your affiliation with the University, or the University's name, symbols, property, or supplies in political activities. You may not display political banners, posters, or literature in University offices or place political bumper stickers or decals on University vehicles. You may not request or collect political contributions during working hours.

If you intend to seek public office or to assume a major role in a political campaign you are obligated to discuss your plans with your supervisor. If your supervisor determines that the activity will impinge to any extent upon the full discharge of your responsibilities to the University, your plans must be reviewed through regular administrative channels to the Chancellor for a determination of work-load and salary adjustment, with such determination reported to and subject to review by the President. Involvements which require part- or full-time services, and for which more than token compensation is received, will require a reduction of work-load and pay, leave-of-absence, or resignation, depending upon the extent of the activity. If you are elected to the Arkansas General Assembly, you must take leave of absence without pay when the General Assembly is in regular or fiscal session and for the duration of extraordinary sessions. If you are elected to any other office, national, statewide, or local, a plan must be developed and reviewed through appropriate administrators to prevent any conflict of commitment.

Friday, May 04, 2012 12:46 PM

9.7 Relations with Legislators and Elected Officials

(Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 910.1; Act 658 of 1999; AHRMS Policy Manual, 175)

As a citizen, you have the right to exercise freedom of expression on legislative matters. However, you should not, unless authorized, attempt to speak on behalf of the University in discussions with members of the Arkansas General Assembly, Arkansas constitutional officers, members of Congress, or local and county elected officials. If you would like the University to consider a matter for incorporation into its legislative program, you may send your suggestion to the Chancellor or to the Office of Governmental Relations.

You have the right to communicate with elected officials concerning matters related to your job, and cannot be subjected to discipline, reprimands, or notations in your personnel file because you exercised that right. However, if you intentionally make untrue allegations to an elected official concerning matters related to your job, you may be subject to discipline.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:13 PM

9.8 Whistle-Blower Protection and Fraud Reporting

(Arkansas Code Ann., § 21-1-601 et. Seq.; Act 1523 of 1999 as amended by Act 601 of 2003; AHRMS Policy Manual, 185) ; Board Policy 355.1

If you communicate, or someone authorized to act on your behalf communicates in good faith to an appropriate authority the existence of waste of public funds, property, or manpower, including federal funds, property, or manpower, administered or controlled by a public employer, or a violation or suspected violation of a law, rule, or regulation adopted by the state of Arkansas or one of its political subdivisions by a state agency or institution, you cannot be discharged, threatened, or otherwise discriminated or retaliated against for making that report verbally or in writing.

The violation you report must be more than technical or minimal in nature, of a state statute or regulation, of a political subdivision ordinance or regulation, or of a code of conduct or code of ethics designed to protect the interest of the public or a public employer. "Waste" means a state agency's or an institution of higher education's conduct or omissions which result in substantial abuse, misuse, destruction, or loss of public funds, property, or manpower belonging to or derived from the State or local political subdivision's resources. Your communication about the violation or waste must be made at a time and in a manner that gives the public employer reasonable notice of the need to correct the waste or violation. You communicate in good faith when you have a reasonable basis in fact for your report of waste or a violation. Good faith is lacking when you do not have personal knowledge of a factual basis for your report or when you knew or reasonably should have known that your communication about the waste or violation is malicious, false, or frivolous.

If you participate or give information in an investigation, hearing, court proceeding, legislative, or other inquiry, or in any form of administrative review, you cannot be discharged, threatened, or otherwise discriminated or retaliated against for that action.

You cannot be discharged, threatened, or otherwise discriminated or retaliated against if you object to or refuse to carry out a directive that you reasonably believe violates a law or a rule or regulation adopted under the authority of the laws of the state.

However, if your employer can prove that adverse action has been taken against you because of your misconduct, poor job performance, or a reduction in the workforce unrelated to the communication you made, you are not protected by this Act.

If you allege a violation of these "Whistle-Blower" protections, you may bring a civil action for appropriate injunctive relief or actual damages, or both, within one hundred eighty (180) calendar days after the occurrence of the alleged violation.

The "Whistle-Blower" Act does not permit disclosures which would diminish or impair the rights of any person or public official to the confidentiality of records or working papers that are protected by statute or common law.

You must report any detected or suspected fraud involving employees, consultants, vendors, contractors, outside agencies doing business with the University or any other parties with a business relationship to the University.  You may make the report by calling the confidential, toll-free UA System Fraud Hotline: 866-252-9838.

The Internal Audit Department will coordinate the investigation with the University's General Counsel and other affected areas, both internal and external.  If you have a question about whether an action constitutes fraud, you may contact the Internal Audit director for guidance,

Actions constituting fraud include, but are not limited to:

  • An entry into the accounting records that is intentionally made to represent what is not true or does not exist, with intent to deceive;
  • Forgery of a check, bank draft, wire transfer or any other University financial document;
  • Unauthorized alteration of any financial document or account belonging to the University;
  • Misappropriation of funds, securities, supplies or other University assets;
  • Impropriety in the handling or reporting of money or financial transactions;
  • Disclosing confidential and proprietary information to outside parties for personal gain, except as allowed under the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act or other law;
  • Accepting or seeking anything of material value from contractors, vendors or persons providing services or materials to the University, except as provided in gift policies;
  • Unauthorized destruction, removal or use of records, furniture, fixtures and equipment for personal gain;
  • Any similar or related inappropriate conduct.

The Internal Audit Department treats all information received confidentially.  If you suspect dishonest or fraudulent activity, you must notify the Internal Audit Department and should not attempt personally to conduct investigations or interviews related to the suspected fraud.  Investigative results will not be disclosed to or discussed with anyone other than those who have a legitimate right to know.  Great care must be taken in the investigation of suspected improprieties or wrongdoings to avoid mistaken accusations or alerting suspected individuals that an investigation is under way.

Thursday, August 16, 2012 2:38 PM

9.9 Code of Computing Practices

Summary:

(Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 201.0; Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, 20 U.S.C. §1232g; Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510 et seq.; 18 U.S.C. § 1030; Arkansas Freedom of Information Act, Arkansas Code Ann. §§ 25-19-101 et seq.; Arkansas Code Ann. §§ 5-41-101 et seq.)

Computing resources are provided to enhance teaching, research, service, and the activities which support them. When you use University computing resources or are granted the use of a computing account, you are expected to use your access, accounts, and resources responsibly and for the intended educational, research, and administrative purposes. You may not use your account for private consulting or personal gain. If you have access to privileged or sensitive information, you should keep it confidential. Your use of computing and network resources should always be legal and ethical, reflect academic honesty, and show restraint in the consumption of shared resources. It should demonstrate respect for intellectual property, ownership of data, system security mechanisms, the right to personal privacy, and the right of individuals to freedom from intimidation and harassment. You must adhere to copyright and licensing agreements and should become familiar with those for each specific product you use before using it.

You may produce, in a manner consistent with this code, an individual World Wide Web page through your University account. It must include a disclaimer as specified in the Code of Computing Practices. The University does not approve, preview, or censor home pages and accepts no responsibility for their content, or for the content of electronic mail communications. Approval for listservs or newsgroups must be obtained from the appropriate system administrator. The University does not control the content of lists or newsgroups and does not assume responsibility for their content.

You do not own your University computer accounts, but are granted use of them. The University will access electronic files, including e-mail files, only under one or more of the following conditions: you consent in writing to such access; there is an emergency which may affect someone's physical health or well-being or may result in the damage or destruction of University property; there is reason to believe that a violation of law or University policy is occurring or has occurred; or access is necessary for maintenance of computers, networks, data, and storage systems, or to protect the rights or property of the University or other users.

Electronic files, including e-mail files, of University employees are potentially subject to public inspection and copying under the state Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which states that "All records maintained in public offices or by public employees within the scope of their employment are presumed to be public records."

Records containing information directly related to a student are confidential and protected from public disclosure by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. You may not access any such records maintained in an electronic format or disclose or distribute their contents in a manner inconsistent with federal and state laws and University regulations. Confidential information placed in computers must be protected appropriately.

You should not give your password to any unauthorized user and should take advantage of system-provided protection measures to prevent unauthorized use of or access to your account, your computer, and its network. If you cease to be a member of the campus community, are assigned new responsibilities, or take a new position, your account and access authorization will be reviewed. You may not use facilities, accounts, access codes, privileges, or information which you are not authorized to use.

You must not attempt to access, copy, or destroy programs or files that belong to other users or to the University, nor use University computing resources for unauthorized monitoring of electronic communications. You must not create, run, install, or knowingly distribute a computer virus, Trojan Horse, or other surreptitiously destructive program, e-mail, or data via any University computer or network facility, regardless of whether it results in demonstrable harm. University computers must not be used to annoy, harass, threaten, intimidate, terrify or offend another person, disrupt or damage another person's work, or invade another's privacy. Sending electronic chain letters, spamming, spoofing, and engaging in resource-intensive activities unrelated to University functions are also prohibited. Violation of this code may result in revocation or suspension of access privileges, in disciplinary action, or legal sanctions. For full text see the University Code of Computing Practices.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:11 PM

9.10 Solicitation, Fund-Raising, and Gifts

(Board Policy 225.1; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 715.1; Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 203.0, 221.0; Governor's Policy Directive #4; AHRMS Policy Manual, 200-1.2)

University facilities are for the non-profit, tax-exempt use of the University's program of higher education and may not be used for raising money not connected with a University activity or for the conduct of private business. However, in certain limited areas, the University contracts with private businesses to provide services on campus for students, faculty, and staff.

University Development's goals are to see that gifts are deposited, disbursed, and processed in a timely manner, that donors are properly thanked and receipted within an appropriate time frame, that alumni and friends of the University are not inundated with requests for support, and that the campus' fund-raising priorities are addressed and met. The following guidelines are intended to ensure the efficient and effective operation of development programs and to maximize the campus' potential for receiving private support:

All annual fund programs and solicitation, especially direct mail solicitations, are to be carried out for the University's departments and colleges by University Development. Campus units may not conduct major gift solicitations or fund-raising activities without the knowledge and consent of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Development. All direct fund-raising solicitations should be cleared in advance by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Development and by the appropriate dean or director. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Development must also approve access to alumni addresses for fund-raising purposes. Procedures for processing gifts received by colleges, departments, or other campus units can be found in Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 203.0.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:08 PM

9.11 Teamwork and Cooperation

The University operates most effectively and is best able to carry out its responsibilities when you and your co-workers cooperate with each other and function as a team. Teamwork will help you and the other employees you work with perform your jobs more easily and is one of the best ways of improving your department's efficiency and accomplishing the University's goals. Teamwork requires cooperation, and it means that your and every other employee's contribution is important. If you have suggestions for improving your working procedures or for carrying out your responsibilities more efficiently, discuss them with your co-workers and your supervisor. While it may not be possible to implement every good idea or resolve every problem, more can be accomplished when each employee addresses problems with a spirit of good will and an understanding of the value of mutual collaboration.

An important contributing factor to the University's success is the way in which employees get along with each other. The University does not attempt to restrict you with unnecessary rules governing your conduct on the job. However, your attitude toward your work and toward your co-workers can affect your own productivity and that of your entire work unit.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:07 PM

9.12 Criminal Arrests, Charges or Convictions

University employees must report to their supervisor, within 24 hours or at the earliest possible opportunity thereafter, any criminal arrests, criminal charges, or criminal convictions, excluding misdemeanor traffic offenses punishable only by fine. Employees must cooperate fully during any review process undertaken by the University. Failure to make such a report or to cooperate with such a review shall constitute grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

10. Termination of Employment

10.1 Retirement

(Board Policy 425.4; Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 430.1, 430.2; Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 412.0)

Since January 1, 1994, there has been no mandatory retirement age for any University employee. If you are planning to retire, you should discuss your intentions with your supervisor, as early as possible, so your department can prepare for the effects of your retirement. A number of benefits are available to retirees who meet eligibility criteria, including use of the University libraries, waiver of fees for membership in the HPER facility, waiver of fees for enrollment in University courses on a space-available basis, faculty/staff admission to campus activities and events, a free parking permit, listing in the campus directory, free e-mail and access to the internet, continuation of discounts on men's athletics tickets, eligibility for retiree health insurance if the retiree meets the plan criteria, and a University identification card designating the retiree as a retired faculty or staff member.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:05 PM

10.2 Early Retirement

(Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 430.3)

During certain window incentive periods, non-tenured faculty and staff employees who are at least 55 years old and have at least 15 years of full-time continuous employment with the University may be considered for a voluntary early retirement program. It is not available to employees who are on leave without pay or who are receiving long-term disability or workers' compensation benefits.

Participation in the program is not an entitlement, and employees may participate only if a savings to the University can be demonstrated and the terms and circumstances of their retirement would not be detrimental to the University and its programs, including the department and unit from which the employee retires.

Benefits may take the form of a stipend without requiring work, wages for part-time work, contributions to the employee's retirement account, reimbursement for medical or life insurance premiums, a combination of these benefits, or other arrangements. The type and amount of the benefits will be determined by the department and the University, within the limits of the policy.

Proposals for voluntary early retirement of qualified non-tenured faculty members and staff employees of the University will be considered during announced periods of time or windows of opportunity, with retirement to take place at the convenience of the employing department or other unit, but no later than the end of the next academic year. Subject to the approval of the President, the University may consider proposals for voluntary early retirement during as many or as few time periods or windows of opportunity as it determines are in its best interests to offer. A window of opportunity may be opened to non-tenured faculty only, to staff only, or to both. There is no requirement that any such opportunities be offered at a later date nor that they will be offered on a regular basis. The University also reserves the right to modify the number of years of continuous employment required for eligibility and the form of benefits available during any given window of opportunity, subject to approval by the President and in accordance with applicable policies.

Copies of the full text of the campus policy are available on request from Human Resources.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:04 PM

10.3 Employee Resignation

(Board Policy 405.3)

If you find it necessary to resign from your position at the University, you should give your supervisor or department head as much advance notice as possible, and, except under extenuating circumstances, no less than two weeks written notice. Your supervisor or department head will help you complete the necessary forms and the other steps in the termination process. If you terminate your employment with the University voluntarily and with proper notice, you may be considered for reemployment at a later date, either in the same department or in another area of the University.

Resignation is generally not a good way to resolve problems with your working conditions or other sources of job dissatisfaction. If you are experiencing work-related problems and are unable to resolve them through discussions with your supervisor or department head, the University's grievance officer, in the Office of Affirmative Action, may be able to help you and your department arrive at a satisfactory resolution.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:03 PM

10.4 Termination of Employment by the University

(Board Policy 405.4)

Arkansas is an employment-at-will state. All staff employees of the University, whether full-time, part-time, extra-help, or other, may have their employment terminated by the University at any time, with thirty days written notice, or be dismissed for cause in accordance with University procedures. Students and hourly employees are hired to work at the pleasure of the University and may be terminated at any time without notice. If the termination is related to unsatisfactory work performance, the procedures described in Section 4.3, Performance Reviews, should be followed. The University does not need to give advance notice if employment is terminated for cause, such as dishonesty, insubordination, other incidents of misconduct, or unlawful behavior.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:01 PM

10.5 Retrenchment

(Board Policy 405.5)

Retrenchment occurs when a reduction in programs or services occurs because of financial exigency or because of formal academic planning such as changes in the institutional mission, substantial program changes, or major reallocations of resources for academic or support services. If retrenchment makes it necessary to eliminate jobs or reduce the University workforce, classified employees will, under normal circumstances, be given thirty days notice and non-classified employees will, under normal circumstances, be given at least sixty days notice. The University will make serious efforts to help employees affected by retrenchment identify other employment opportunities in the University.

Departments considering retrenchment should notify Human Resources as far in advance as possible so required forms can be completed and sent to the state Office of Personnel Management.

Monday, September 28, 2009 2:00 PM

10.6 Termination Checklist
If you leave University employment for any reason, you must return your staff identification card, your keys, any library books you have checked out, any uniforms issued to you, and any University procurement or credit cards, and settle your accounts with the Treasurer's Office, the Libraries, and the University Health Center before your final pay is released. You may return your parking permit hangtag to the Department of Parking and Transit customer service counter and exchange it for a student permit if you will become a University student. When your termination date is determined and entered into the BASIS system, a notice will be sent, via e-mail, to the University offices involved in the termination clearance process.

Tuesday, May 01, 2012 3:30 PM

10.7 Continuation of Benefits

(Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985)

If your employment with the University is terminated for any reason other than as a result of gross misconduct while you are covered by the University's medical insurance plan, or if you become a part-time employee and are no longer eligible for coverage under the medical insurance plan, you may continue your coverage, at your own expense, for up to eighteen months or until you are covered by another plan, whichever comes first, under the provisions of the federal Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (COBRA). Your covered dependents may also be eligible for COBRA coverage under certain circumstances. The University's COBRA administrator will be notified by Human Resources of the termination of your employment. Detailed information about the specific provisions of COBRA coverage is available from the benefits section of Human Resources.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:58 PM

10.8 Termination Pay

(Universitywide Administrative Memorandum 440.4; Arkansas Code Ann §21-4-501; AHMRS Policy Manual 220.22.4)

When you leave University employment, the amount due to you from unused accrued annual leave, up to thirty days or 240 hours, will be paid to you as a lump sum, in a separate check issued on the 15th of the month following your termination. You will also receive payment for any compensatory time accrued as a result of approved overtime work, and any accrued holiday time, if you are a non-exempt employee. If you receive payment for unused leave, you may not return to employment with the University or with any other state agency or institution until the number of days for which you received the additional compensation has expired. If you have any unpaid debts to the University at the time of your termination, the University will withhold an amount from your final paycheck to cover them. If you die while you are an active employee, your estate will be paid any amount due to you for up to sixty days or 480 hours accrued annual leave.

If you are a classified employee, you may receive compensation for unused sick leave when you retire, in accordance with the formula outlines in Section 7.3, above.  If you return to state employment, you will not be required to wait nor to repay compensation for unused sick leave received at retirement.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:57 PM

10.9 Re-employment

So long as you leave the University in good standing, you are eligible to be considered for re-employment in the same or another University unit.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:55 PM

11. Complaint Resolution

11.1 Informal Complaint Resolution

You should make every attempt to resolve problems you encounter at work informally, through discussion with the other persons involved, and in a spirit of goodwill and cooperation. If you address potential problems early, they are less likely to escalate into grievances. Your supervisor or department head may be able to help you resolve complaints and other problems informally and with as little disruption and distress as possible.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:53 PM

11.2 Employee Grievance Procedure

11.2   Employee Grievance Procedure

In the event that a problem cannot be resolved informally, the following grievance procedure is available to staff employees:

Definitions

  1. Day:  A regularly scheduled work day, excluding holidays, unless otherwise specified.
     
  2. Grievance:
     
    1. Unless excluded below, a grievance is a complaint of a staff employee against the University concerning:
       
      1. the interpretation, application, or claimed violation of a specific term or provision of University policy, or
         
      2. other matters that affect the employment relationship of the staff employee to the University.
         
    2. Excluded from the procedure are complaints relating to:
       
      1. wages and salaries;
         
      2. falsification of application materials;
         
      3. retrenchment of employees pursuant to Board Policy 405.5;
         
      4. matters involving reappointment, performance evaluation, and promotion that do not concern a claimed failure by the University to follow established policy;
         
      5. classification of positions; or
         
      6. termination with 30 days notice.
         
  3. Grievance panel:  Prior to the beginning of each fiscal year, the vice chancellor responsible for each of the four administrative units (Academic Affairs, Finance and Administration, Student Affairs and University Advancement) shall submit to the Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance the names of seven staff employees (both classified and non-classified as defined in definition 7, below) from within their respective administrative units.  The Chancellor's Office and Athletics Department staff shall be eligible for selection to the panel by the Vice Chancellor for University Advancement.  The 28 employees whose names are submitted will comprise the grievance panel for one fiscal year.
     
  4. Grievance committee:  Five staff employees will be selected from the grievance panel as the grievance committee for each grievance.  Two members shall be selected by the grievant and two by the vice chancellor for the grievant's administrative unit.  The last member shall be selected by the first four.  Only the last member may be selected from the grievant's administrative unit.  The grievance committee shall hear all evidence relevant to the grievance, make findings, and make recommendations to the Chancellor based on its findings.  The committee shall not be bound by official rules of evidence and shall have no subpoena power.
     
  5. Grievance officer:  The individual responsible for assisting all staff employees during the grievance process and for overseeing all procedural matters and paperwork pertaining thereto.  The grievance officer shall be designated by the Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance and shall work in the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance.
     
  6. Grievance record:  A file shall be maintained by the grievance officer that shall include documentation pertaining to all stages of a grievance.  The grievance officer shall be the custodian of the grievance record.  The grievance record shall be treated as confidential, subject to applicable law.  In particular, whether a grievance record is subject to disclosure under the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act shall be determined on a case-by-case basis consistent with governing law.
     
  7. Staff employee:  Any person who a) fills a classified position falling within the purview of the Uniform Classification and Compensation Act or b) who fills a non-classified position not considered faculty or administrator as defined in Section 2.1 of the Staff Handbook.

Rights and Responsibilities

  1. Each grievance shall be handled promptly and impartially, without fear of coercion, discrimination, or reprisal.  Each participant in a grievance shall do his or her part to protect this right.
     
  2. A grievant, any witness, any other employee involved as a participant in the grievance process, and any member of the grievance committee shall be provided release time from her or his work unit, as necessary, to participate in the grievance process.
     
  3. If a representative of the University fails to observe the time limits required herein, the grievance may be advanced to the next step in the process at the request of the grievant.  If the grievant fails to observe the time limits required herein, the grievance shall be closed.  However, at any time, the time limits may be extended by the grievance officer, with the approval of the Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance, under unusual circumstances or when such extension is deemed to be in the best interest of the grievant or the University.
     
  4. At the end of the procedure for each grievance, the grievance officer shall a) close the grievance record for retention by the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance, and b) submit a written summary of the grievance to the Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance.

Informal Resolution Procedure

Grievant's responsibility:  The grievant shall first attempt to resolve the grievance informally with his or her immediate supervisor and, as necessary, with the immediate supervisor of his or her immediate supervisor.

Supervisor's responsibility:  All supervisors, to the best of their ability, are required to inform, listen to, and counsel with employees on all matters affecting them and to resolve informally, if possible, all grievances.  In the event the informal attempts to resolve the grievance are not successful and the grievant wishes to pursue the matter, he or she shall initiate a meeting with the grievance officer.

Grievance officer's responsibility:  The grievance officer shall work with appropriate parties in an attempt to resolve the grievance informally.  If the process fails to bring about a satisfactory resolution, the grievant may initiate the following formal grievance procedure.

Formal Grievance Procedure

Step I

  1. The grievant must contact the grievance officer to initiate the formal grievance procedure.  The grievant shall submit to the grievance officer a written statement of the facts and the resolution sought.  The statement must be signed and dated by the grievant.  The statement must be submitted to the grievance officer within 30 calendar days of the date of the incident/event that gave rise to the grievance or of the date the employee became aware of the incident/event that gave rise to the grievance.  Forms will be provided for this purpose.
     
  2. The grievance officer shall:
     
    1. determine if there is a grievance as defined herein;
       
    2. advise the grievant of the steps to be followed in the formal grievance procedure; and
       
    3. advise the grievant of his or her right to:
       
      1. use the grievance procedure;  

      2. receive release time as necessary to participate in the grievance procedure (the grievant is cautioned about abusing his or her right to released time);
         
      3. receive copies of all documentation, regardless of form, during all steps of the grievance procedure; and
         
      4. take further action through external remedies when the internal administrative process has been exhausted.
         
  3. If the grievance officer determines that there is no grievance as defined herein, the Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance shall make a final determination on that issue.  If the final determination is that there is no grievance as defined herein, the staff employee will be encouraged to pursue further informal discussion of the problem and shall be advised that he or she is free to consult an attorney.
     
  4. Within five days of receipt of the grievance statement, the grievance officer shall transmit a copy of the grievance to the grievant's immediate supervisor.
     
  5. Within five days of receipt of the grievance statement, the supervisor shall either (1) set a date for a formal meeting or (2) respond to the grievant in writing.  The decision to set a meeting is at the discretion of the supervisor.  
     
    1. Meeting option
       
      1. The supervisor shall contact the grievance officer and arrange a time and a place for a meeting.  The grievance officer shall inform the grievant.
         
      2. The supervisor, the grievant, the grievance officer and any other person(s) deemed appropriate by the supervisor in consultation with the grievance officer shall meet at the time and place arranged and discuss the grievance with the goal of agreeing upon a resolution of the grievance.
         
      3. Whether a resolution was agreed upon at the meeting or not, the grievance officer shall write a summary of the meeting and submit copies to the supervisor and the grievant.
         
      4. The supervisor shall prepare a written statement addressed to the grievant and containing items agreed upon in the meeting and the supervisor's proposal for resolution of the grievance.  The written statement shall be submitted to the grievance officer, who shall transmit it to the grievant.
         
    2. Written response option

The supervisor shall prepare a written response addressed to the grievant and containing the supervisor's proposal for resolution of the grievance and the reasons for the course of action proposed.  The written statement shall be submitted to the grievance officer, who shall transmit it to the grievant.

Step II

  1. If the grievant is not satisfied with the written statement prepared by the supervisor, the grievant will have five days in which to provide the grievance officer with a written request for a review of the grievance by the grievant's director or department head.  (If the immediate supervisor is a director or department head, the grievance will move to Step III [for academic units only] or Step IV in the process.)
     
  2. Within five days of receipt of the written request for review of the grievance, the grievance officer shall transmit the grievance statement and all pertinent documentation to the grievant's director or department head.
     
  3. Within five days of receipt of the grievance statement, the director or department head shall either (1) set a formal meeting or (2) respond to the grievant in writing.  The decision to set a meeting is at the discretion of the director or department head.   
     
    1. Meeting option
       
      1. The director or department head shall contact the grievance officer and arrange a time and a place for a meeting.  The grievance officer shall inform the grievant.
         
      2. The director or department head, the grievant, the grievance officer and any other person(s) deemed appropriate by the director or department head in consultation with the grievance officer shall meet at the time and place arranged and discuss the grievance with the goal of agreeing upon a resolution of the grievance.
         
      3. Whether a resolution was agreed upon at the meeting or not, the grievance officer shall write a summary of the meeting and submit copies to the director or department head and the grievant.
         
      4. The director or department head shall prepare a written statement addressed to the grievant and containing items agreed upon in the meeting and the director or department head's proposal for resolution of the grievance.  The written statement shall be submitted to the grievance officer, who shall transmit it to the grievant.
         
    2. Written response option

The director or department head shall prepare a written response addressed to the grievant and containing the director or department head's proposal for resolution of the grievance and the reasons for the course of action proposed. The written statement shall be submitted to the grievance officer, who shall transmit it to the grievant within five days.

Step III (for academic units only)

  1. If the grievant is not satisfied with the written statement prepared by the director or department head, the grievant will have five days in which to provide the grievance officer with a written request for a review of the grievance by the grievant's dean.  (If the immediate supervisor is a dean, the grievance will move to Step IV in the process.)
     
  2. Within five days of receipt of the written request for review of the grievance, the grievance officer shall transmit the grievance statement and all pertinent documentation to the grievant's dean.
     
  3. Within five days of receipt of the grievance statement, the dean shall either (1) set a formal meeting or (2) respond to the grievant in writing.  The decision to set a meeting is at the discretion of the dean.
     
    1. Meeting option
       
      1. The dean shall contact the grievance officer and arrange a time and a place for a meeting.  The grievance officer shall inform the grievant.
         
      2. The dean, the grievant, the grievance officer and any other person(s) deemed appropriate by the dean in consultation with the grievance officer shall meet at the time and place arranged and discuss the grievance with the goal of agreeing upon a resolution of the grievance.
         
      3. Whether a resolution was agreed upon at the meeting or not, the grievance officer shall write a summary of the meeting and submit copies to the dean and the grievant.
         
      4. The dean shall prepare a written statement addressed to the grievant and containing items agreed upon in the meeting and the dean's proposal for resolution of the grievance.  The written statement shall be submitted to the grievance officer, who shall transmit it to the grievant.
         
    2. Written response option

The dean shall prepare a written response addressed to the grievant and containing the dean's proposal for resolution of the grievance and the reasons for the course of action proposed.  The written statement shall be submitted to the grievance officer who shall transmit it to the grievant within five days.

Step IV

  1. If the grievant is not satisfied with the written statement prepared by the dean (academic units only), director or department head, the grievant will have five days in which to provide the grievance officer with a written request for a review of the grievance by the grievant's vice chancellor.
     
  2. Within five days of receipt of the written request for review of the grievance, the grievance officer shall transmit the grievance statement and all pertinent documentation to the grievant's vice chancellor.
     
  3. Within five days of receipt of the grievance statement, the vice chancellor shall either (1) set a formal meeting or (2) respond to the grievant in writing.  The decision to set a meeting is at the discretion of the vice chancellor.  
     
    1. Meeting option
       
      1. The vice chancellor shall contact the grievance officer and arrange a time and a place for a meeting.  The grievance officer shall inform the grievant.
         
      2. The vice chancellor, the grievant, the grievance officer and any other person(s) deemed appropriate by the vice chancellor in consultation with the grievance officer shall meet at the time and place arranged and discuss the grievance with the goal of agreeing upon a resolution of the grievance.
         
      3. Whether a resolution was agreed upon at the meeting or not, the grievance officer shall write a summary of the meeting and submit copies to the vice chancellor and the grievant.
         
      4. The vice chancellor shall prepare a written statement addressed to the grievant and containing items agreed upon in the meeting and the vice chancellor's proposal for resolution of the grievance.  The written statement shall be submitted to the grievance officer, who shall transmit it to the grievant.
         
    2. Written response option

The vice chancellor shall prepare a written response addressed to the grievant and containing the vice chancellor's proposal for resolution of the grievance and the reasons for the course of action proposed. The written statement shall be submitted to the grievance officer who shall transmit it to the grievant within five days.

Step V

  1. If the grievant is not satisfied with the written statement prepared by the vice chancellor, the grievant will have five days in which to provide the grievance officer with a written request for a review of the grievance by a grievance committee.
     
  2. Within five days of receipt of the written request for review of the grievance, the grievance officer shall initiate formation of a grievance committee pursuant to the procedure described in the "Definitions" section above.
     
  3. Within five days of the formation of the grievance committee, the grievance officer shall:
     
    1. inform the Chancellor in writing that a grievance committee has been formed;
       
    2. call the grievance committee members together to: 1) advise the committee members of their responsibility to select a committee chairperson; and 2) provide the grievance record to the grievance committee.
       
    3. establish a mutually agreeable time and place for the hearing;
       
    4. notify all parties of the time and place of the hearing; and
       
    5. advise all persons involved of their right to released time.
       
  4. Within 10 days of its meeting with the grievance officer, the grievance committee shall:
     
    1. hear all evidence relevant to the grievance; and
       
    2. determine whether, in the opinion of the committee, University policies and procedures were followed.

The grievant, grievance committee, and the University representative may request the presence at the hearing of anyone having information pertinent to the grievance.  In the event of a disagreement about the pertinence of the information to be considered, the grievance committee, in consultation with the grievance officer, may make a determination regarding whether to consider the offered information, taking into account the likely usefulness of the information in reaching a fair determination in the matter and the efficient conduct of the grievance process. 

  1. Within two days of the conclusion of the hearing, the grievance officer shall transmit the grievance record to the Chancellor.
     
  2. Within five days of the conclusion of the hearing, the grievance committee shall submit in writing to the Chancellor the committee's proposal for resolution of the grievance and the reasons for the course of action proposed.
     
  3. The Chancellor shall prepare a written statement addressed to the grievant containing the Chancellor's decision for resolution of the grievance and the reasons for the decision.  The Chancellor may request that the committee clarify its recommendations or review additional aspects of the matter.  The Chancellor's decision shall be considered final, and no further administrative review shall be available to the grievant.

A copy of the grievance committee's proposal for resolution of the grievance shall be attached to the written statement.  The written statement shall be submitted to the grievant, with a copy to the grievance officer.

  1. The grievance officer shall inform the grievant's immediate supervisor, dean, director or department head, and vice chancellor, as applicable, of the action required to carry out the decision of the Chancellor.

 

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 9:05 AM

12. Campus Services and Facilities

12.1 Parking on Campus

If you wish to park a vehicle on campus, you must purchase a faculty/staff parking permit. There is an annual fee for the permit, which can be paid through payroll deduction. A limited number of reserved parking and parking deck permits are available at a higher fee.

Accessible parking permits are available at the normal cost to any student or employee who has a state accessible parking placard or license plate issued in his or her name. If you have a temporary illness or disability for which you require accessible parking, the University will issue you a temporary accessible parking permit if you have a state accessible parking placard or an appropriate licensed physician's statement recommending a temporary accessible permit. The temporary accessible permit will be issued for the same length of time as the state temporary placard, up to a maximum of 90 days. Generally, temporary permits will not be extended. If you request an extension to a ninety-day temporary permit, you will have to present additional information from an appropriate licensed physician. The Director of Transit and Parking will review your request for an extension with assistance, as necessary, from the Director of the Center for Educational Access and other University officials.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:47 PM

12.2 Razorback Transit System

Razorback Transit provides fixed-route bus service on campus and to major off-campus living and shopping areas, Monday through Friday, from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during the spring and fall semesters, and on a reduced schedule during the summer. Anyone may ride Razorback Transit buses, and no fare is charged. Bus maps and schedules are available on the University's web site, at several campus locations, and from the Parking and Transit Department. All buses are equipped with wheelchair lifts, and a demand-response paratransit van is available, in an area three-quarters of a mile from any fixed Razorback transit route, to students and employees who cannot access the regular route buses. Certification of eligibility to use the paratransit service is required.  Detailed information about making arrangements for paratransit pick-up can be found in Fayetteville Policies and Procedures 204.0.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:46 PM

12.3 University Police

The University of Arkansas Police Department provides comprehensive, 24-hour professional police services to the University community. Emergency telephones with direct access to the University police are located throughout the campus. The University police may also be reached by calling 575-2222 or by dialing 911 on campus. University police should be called in case of campus emergencies such as automobile accidents, medical emergencies, or violent assaults. University police also provide assistance with crowd control for University-sponsored events, motorist assistance, escort services on campus at night, and assist in recovery of lost or stolen property. They will work with other law enforcement agencies to resolve crimes against students, faculty, and staff, and will provide assistance in dealing with harassing phone calls, threats, and vandalism.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:44 PM

12.4 Environmental Health and Safety

If you find an unsafe condition in your workplace, report it to your supervisor immediately. If you find an unsafe condition elsewhere on campus, report it to Environmental Health and Safety at 575-5448. Environmental Health and Safety provides training in safety procedures and equipment use, including fire prevention; fire extinguisher testing and replacement; hazardous materials management; chemical handling and storage procedures; disposal of laboratory animals, laboratory chemicals, biological waste, radioactive waste, or other hazardous waste; radiation safety; occupational health and safety; chemical and laboratory safety; emergency equipment selection and testing; building environmental conditions; and compliance with environmental health and safety laws and regulations.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:44 PM

12.5 Lost and Found

A central lost and found office for the campus is located in the Physical Plant. The campus telephone number is 575-4494.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:43 PM

12.6 Campus Information

Information for prospective students and visitors to the campus is available in the main lobby of Hunt Hall. An Information Desk located in Arkansas Union provides information about campus meetings, exhibits, films, lectures, workshops and conferences. Information about campus events can also be found on campus bulletin boards, in flyers distributed through campus mail, and on the University web page. Emergency and information phones can be found in numerous locations around campus.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:42 PM

12.7 Printing and Copying Services

Design, lay-out, printing, copying, and duplicating services are provided to University departments by University Printing Services and by Copying Services, which controls and maintains copying machines on campus. Copying for personal uses is available at a reasonable price in the copying centers located in the Arkansas Union and Hotz Hall, and copying machines are available in Mullins Library.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:41 PM

12.8 Mailing and Postal Services

The campus Mailing Service delivers mail twice a day to University departments. You may use campus mail to send written communications of a reasonable size, shape, and weight, but not books, supplies, or bulky and heavy materials. Campus mail is for official University business only. Campus Mailing Services will also provide assistance to departments in preparing bulk mailings, business reply mail, metered mail, expedited mailing services, and other special mailings. The Campus Post Office is a full-service post office located in the Arkansas Union. It sells postage stamps; processes certified, registered, special delivery, and insured mail; provides express and parcel mailing services; and assists with mailing to international destinations.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:39 PM

12.9 University Publications

Arkansas Newswire is produced by the Office of University Relations and distributed through e-mail to employees and others who subscribe. The Arkansas Traveler is the student newspaper, published by students and distributed to campus buildings during the spring and fall semesters and n a reduced schedule during the summer. The Razorback is the student yearbook and is published annually by students. The Alumni Office, several of the colleges, and some University departments produce specialized publications. Most University departments and other units have web pages. The University's main web site is http://www.uark.edu/.

Friday, May 07, 2010 12:00 PM

12.10 Libraries

The library system for the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville includes the David W. Mullins Library, which is the main research library on campus, and five branch libraries: the Robert A. and Vivian Young Law Library, the Fine Arts Library, the Chemistry Library, the Physics Library, and the Learning Resources Center. You may check out materials from the University libraries through the convenient electronic check-out system, using your staff identification card. The University of Arkansas Libraries' records are computerized on the InfoLinks library system. Information on holdings can be accessed and searched from computers within the library, as well as from your office or home computer via modem or network connection. Other library catalogs and general and specialized indexing and abstracting databases can also be accessed through InfoLinks. A number of electronic resources and databases are available on-line.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:37 PM

12.11 Bookstore

The University Bookstore, located in the Arkansas Union, sells textbooks, reference and general reading books, magazines, and supplies in the main bookstore, and clothing, cards, snacks, and gift items in the Razorback Shop. The Computer Store carries computer hardware, software, parts, accessories, and supplies; its factory-authorized service center provides repair and upgrade services. You will receive a 10% discount on many bookstore items if you show your staff identification card at the time you make your purchases.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:36 PM

12.12 Cultural Activities

The University offers a wide range of cultural and educational activities which are open to all members of the University community and to the general public. Among the resources are permanent and special exhibits at the University Museum, art exhibits in the Fine Arts Gallery and the Anne Kittrell Gallery in the Arkansas Union, architecture exhibits, theater performances, concerts and other musical performances, lectures, panel discussions, films, symposia, historical and cultural exhibits, festivals, international programs, and other events. You can find information about these opportunities through University publications, flyers, posters, and electronic listings, including Arkansas Newswire.

Friday, May 07, 2010 12:01 PM

12.13 Recreational Facilities

The department of University Recreation serves the university community by providing a diverse selection of recreational opportunities and facilities, which are designed to enhance the quality of life of each participant. University Recreation is organized into eight program areas: Accessible Recreation, Club Sports, Facility Management, Fitness/Wellness, Instructional Programs, Intramural Sports, and the Outdoor Connection Center.

University Recreation operates its main facility in the Health, Physical Education and Recreation building, which houses an Olympicsized swimming pool, multiple gymnasiums, an indoor track, the Donna Axum Fitness Center, racquetball courts and the Outdoor Connection Center. In addition to the HPER building, UREC also operates the University Recreation Fitness Center, located on the second floor of the Arkansas Union, which features almost 6,000 square feet of fitness floor space, a 1,500-square-foot group exercise room, and men's and women's locker and shower facilities.

Memberships may be purchased by University faculty, staff and alumni for both the HPER building and the University Recreation Fitness Center. For additional information on the department of University Recreation, please visit http://urec.uark.edu.

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Monday, October 10, 2011 9:43 AM

12.14 University Athletics Tickets

Tickets are required for admission to men's and women's athletic events, and the availability of tickets for some events is limited.  Full-time appointed employees and employees who meet the criteria for retirement privileges or are given the Emeritus rank may purchase up to two non-premium season books of tickets to football at half-price with no seat value donation if the season ticket seats were originally purchased for the Fall 2010 semester football season or before, and at full-price with no seat value donation if the season ticket seats are purchased for the Fall 2011 semester football season or any season thereafter.  Further, employees may purchase up to two non-premium season books at half price for Men's basketball, and discounted season ticket books to baseball games.  Half-time appointed employees may purchase one season book to each of these sporting events with adherence to the same pricing structure.  All employees are occasionally offered discounted or free tickets to individual women's softball, basketball, soccer, and volleyball games and gymnastic meets. In certain instances, the difference between the discounted price of tickets and the full price may be taxable.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010 3:41 PM

12.15 University Health Center

The University Health Center is available to employees for medical examinations and treatment, pharmacy services, immunizations, health education and illness prevention, counseling and psychological services, and for treatment of on-the-job injuries and job-related illnesses. You must make an appointment to use any of these services, except in emergencies.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:31 PM

12.16 Banking and Razorbuck$

There are automated teller machines and a branch bank in the Arkansas Union. Razorbuck$ is a debit card that allows you to deposit money to your account and make cashless purchases on campus. You will receive discounts on some purchases you make with your Razorbuck$ card in the University bookstore and in campus dining facilities.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:29 PM

12.17 UARK Federal Credit Union

The UARK Federal Credit Union is a member organization open to University employees, their family members, alumni, and employees of a few other area organizations. The credit union offers savings and checking accounts, credit cards, traveler's checks, cashier's checks, mortgage loans, automobile loans, consumer loans, IRAs, certificates of deposit, and other financial services. You may have your paycheck deposited to the UARK Credit Union directly. The credit union office is located at 1025 North Garland Avenue.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:28 PM

12.18 University Identification Cards

Unless you are a temporary or hourly employee, you are eligible for a University photograph identification card. You will need an authorization card from your department and a form of picture identification to obtain your card. Identification cards are made between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. in the I.D. and Information Office located in the Arkansas Union. If you are enrolled in classes, you will not need an additional student identification card. There is a replacement charge for a lost or stolen card. The cards are non-transferable and are valid only while you are an active University employee. You must return your card if you leave the University.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:27 PM

12.19 Keys

If you need a key to your office, your building, or both, your department will issue a key authorization card which must also be signed by your building administrator. The Physical Plant key office will assign you the appropriate key or keys. You will be responsible for your University keys, which may not be duplicated. Any keys issued to you must be returned if you leave the University, before you can receive your final paycheck.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:26 PM

12.20 Staff Computer Lab

The Staff Senate provides a staff computer lab located in the Administrative Services Building. Any staff member can use the computers and printer in the lab. Help is available to those who may be uncomfortable using computers or who are not familiar with the University's e-mail and other electronic systems.

Each employee is assigned an official e-mail address at the time of hire. The staff computer lab can be used by employees who do not have computers at their work stations for internet access and for receiving and sending e-mail. Employees can use the lab to access the most recent revision of the Staff Handbook and to find news about the Staff Senate, among other uses.

Monday, September 28, 2009 1:25 PM